mountain sickness


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Related to mountain sickness: chronic mountain sickness

altitude sickness

 [al´tĭ-tūd]
a syndrome caused by exposure to altitude high enough to cause significant hypoxia (lack of oxygen). At high altitudes the atmospheric pressure, and thus arterial oxygen content, are decreased. Called also high-altitude sickness and mountain sickness.

Acute altitude sickness may occur after a few hours' exposure to a high altitude. Mental functions may be affected; there may be lightheadedness and breathlessness; and eventually headache and prostration may occur. Older persons and those with pulmonary or cardiovascular disease are most susceptible. After a few hours or days of acclimation the symptoms will subside.

Chronic altitude sickness (called also Monge's disease and Andes disease) occurs in those living in the high Andes above 15,000 feet. It resembles polycythemia, but is completely relieved if the patient is moved to sea level.

al·ti·tude sick·ness

a syndrome caused by low inspired oxygen pressure (as at high altitude) and characterized by nausea, headache, dyspnea, malaise, and insomnia; in severe instances, pulmonary edema and adult respiratory distress syndrome can occur; Synonym(s): Acosta disease, mountain sickness, puna, soroche

mountain sickness

n.
Altitude sickness brought on by the diminished oxygen pressure at mountain elevations.

mountain sickness

A syndrome affecting those living for various periods at high altitudes, which is diagnosed if a person has 3+ major symptoms: anorexia, dyspnoea, fatigue, headache, insomnia, which generally responds to dexamethasone. Mountain sickness is divided into acute and chronic forms

mountain sickness

Acute MS, altitude anoxia, altitude sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, high altitude pulmonary edema Wilderness medicine A syndrome affecting those living for various periods at high altitudes, which is diagnosed if a person has 3+ major symptoms: anorexia, dyspnea, fatigue, headache, insomnia, which respond to dexamethasone; MS is divided into acute and chronic forms. See High-altitude pulmonary edema, Höhendiurese.

al·ti·tude sick·ness

(al'ti-tūd sik'nĕs)
A syndrome caused by low inspired oxygen pressure (as at high altitude) and characterized by nausea, headache, dyspnea, malaise, and insomnia; in severe instances, pulmonary edema and adult respiratory distress syndrome can occur.
Synonym(s): Acosta disease, aerial sickness, mountain sickness.

mountain sickness

A syndrome caused by reduced oxygen tension in the atmosphere at heights above about 3000 m, especially in people who proceed too quickly to high altitudes. There is deep breathing, a rapid pulse, loss of appetite, greatly reduced capacity for physical or mental work, headache, nausea, weakness, dizziness and insomnia. The vision may be affected by retinal bleeding. The chief danger is from fluid in the lungs (PULMONARY OEDEMA) and brain swelling (cerebral oedema). Either may be fatal unless rapidly corrected by administration of oxygen or an immediate descent to a lower altitude. DIURETIC drugs and DEXAMETHASONE can help to reduce oedema.

mountain sickness

fatigue, headache and nausea in humans resulting from the lack of oxygen above about 4000 m.
Altitude: relation between decreasing barometric pressure and PO2 and levels for athletic training. Broken arrow: altitude sickness possible in the unacclimatized.

altitude

the height above sea level. As atmospheric (barometric) pressure decreases progressively with increasing altitude, from the standard 1 atmosphere at sea level, the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) decreases proportionately; the air still contains the same ∼21% of oxygen but there are fewer molecules of oxygen per unit volume. There is also a drop in temperature and humidity, but the essential problem for human life and activity is shortage of oxygen (hypoxia).

mountain

related in some way to high altitude.

mountain devil
see lambertiaformosa.
mountain disease
see altitude sickness.
mountain gorilla
Gorilla gorilla beringei.
mountain laurel
see kalmia.
mountain lion
see mountain lion.
mountain mahogany
mountain pink
centauriumbeyrichii.
mountain sickness
see altitude sickness.
mountain silvery lupine
lupinusalpestris.
mountain thermopsis
thermopsismontana.
References in periodicals archive ?
Li X, Tao F, Pei T, You H, Liu Y, Gao Y (2011) Population level determinants of acute mountain sickness among young men: a retrospective study.
The incidence, importance and prophylaxis of acute mountain sickness.
Prevalence of acute mountain sickness among Finnish trekkers on Mount Kilimanjaro, Tanzania: an observational study.
Abbreviations: AMS = acute mountain sickness, ANCOVA = analysis of covariance, HA = high altitude, HAI = high altitude illness, LLS = Lake Louise Score, MS = multiple sclerosis, NVWSC = National Veterans Winter Sports Clinic, SCI = spinal cord injury, TBI = traumatic brain injury.
Acute mountain sickness is an issue described 2000 years ago; first by Tseen Hanshoo through the phrase "Great and Little Headache Mountains" on the trip along the Silk Road [12,13], and later in 403 AD by a monk who addressed the headache as a form of high-altitude sickness [12,14].
People have different susceptibilities to altitude sickness; for some otherwise healthy people, Acute Mountain Sickness (AMS) can begin to appear at around 2000 metres (6,500 ft) above sea level, such as at many mountain ski resorts.
People often suffer from acute mountain sickness, with symptoms including headaches, nausea, stomach aches, breathlessness and exhaustion.
High-altitude illness refers to acute mountain sickness (AMS), high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE), and high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE).
I was fearing the worst, AMS or acute mountain sickness but to my immense relief it turned out to be just a viral flu, caused by switching between the high temperature set in my hotel room and the much cooler ambient temperature - all I needed was an extra day of rest and a course of antibiotics and though I was not happy about it as I don't like missing photo opportunities - but I asked for and was granted the next day off, a day when the third group went to Sangam to acclimatise.
Regardless of their levels of physical conditioning, Soldiers can experience increased fatigue or even acute mountain sickness in this environment.