mountain sickness


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Related to mountain sickness: chronic mountain sickness

altitude sickness

 [al´tĭ-tūd]
a syndrome caused by exposure to altitude high enough to cause significant hypoxia (lack of oxygen). At high altitudes the atmospheric pressure, and thus arterial oxygen content, are decreased. Called also high-altitude sickness and mountain sickness.

Acute altitude sickness may occur after a few hours' exposure to a high altitude. Mental functions may be affected; there may be lightheadedness and breathlessness; and eventually headache and prostration may occur. Older persons and those with pulmonary or cardiovascular disease are most susceptible. After a few hours or days of acclimation the symptoms will subside.

Chronic altitude sickness (called also Monge's disease and Andes disease) occurs in those living in the high Andes above 15,000 feet. It resembles polycythemia, but is completely relieved if the patient is moved to sea level.

al·ti·tude sick·ness

a syndrome caused by low inspired oxygen pressure (as at high altitude) and characterized by nausea, headache, dyspnea, malaise, and insomnia; in severe instances, pulmonary edema and adult respiratory distress syndrome can occur; Synonym(s): Acosta disease, mountain sickness, puna, soroche

mountain sickness

n.
Altitude sickness brought on by the diminished oxygen pressure at mountain elevations.

mountain sickness

A syndrome affecting those living for various periods at high altitudes, which is diagnosed if a person has 3+ major symptoms: anorexia, dyspnoea, fatigue, headache, insomnia, which generally responds to dexamethasone. Mountain sickness is divided into acute and chronic forms

mountain sickness

Acute MS, altitude anoxia, altitude sickness, high altitude cerebral edema, high altitude pulmonary edema Wilderness medicine A syndrome affecting those living for various periods at high altitudes, which is diagnosed if a person has 3+ major symptoms: anorexia, dyspnea, fatigue, headache, insomnia, which respond to dexamethasone; MS is divided into acute and chronic forms. See High-altitude pulmonary edema, Höhendiurese.

al·ti·tude sick·ness

(al'ti-tūd sik'nĕs)
A syndrome caused by low inspired oxygen pressure (as at high altitude) and characterized by nausea, headache, dyspnea, malaise, and insomnia; in severe instances, pulmonary edema and adult respiratory distress syndrome can occur.
Synonym(s): Acosta disease, aerial sickness, mountain sickness.

mountain sickness

A syndrome caused by reduced oxygen tension in the atmosphere at heights above about 3000 m, especially in people who proceed too quickly to high altitudes. There is deep breathing, a rapid pulse, loss of appetite, greatly reduced capacity for physical or mental work, headache, nausea, weakness, dizziness and insomnia. The vision may be affected by retinal bleeding. The chief danger is from fluid in the lungs (PULMONARY OEDEMA) and brain swelling (cerebral oedema). Either may be fatal unless rapidly corrected by administration of oxygen or an immediate descent to a lower altitude. DIURETIC drugs and DEXAMETHASONE can help to reduce oedema.

mountain sickness

fatigue, headache and nausea in humans resulting from the lack of oxygen above about 4000 m.
Altitude: relation between decreasing barometric pressure and PO2 and levels for athletic training. Broken arrow: altitude sickness possible in the unacclimatized.

altitude

the height above sea level. As atmospheric (barometric) pressure decreases progressively with increasing altitude, from the standard 1 atmosphere at sea level, the partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) decreases proportionately; the air still contains the same ∼21% of oxygen but there are fewer molecules of oxygen per unit volume. There is also a drop in temperature and humidity, but the essential problem for human life and activity is shortage of oxygen (hypoxia).

mountain

related in some way to high altitude.

mountain devil
see lambertiaformosa.
mountain disease
see altitude sickness.
mountain gorilla
Gorilla gorilla beringei.
mountain laurel
see kalmia.
mountain lion
see mountain lion.
mountain mahogany
mountain pink
centauriumbeyrichii.
mountain sickness
see altitude sickness.
mountain silvery lupine
lupinusalpestris.
mountain thermopsis
thermopsismontana.
References in periodicals archive ?
Acute mountain sickness in disability and adaptive sports: preliminary data.
If you were to take someone to that altitude who was altitude naive, they would have a 50-50 chance of developing acute mountain sickness.
The third phase of the expedition will take place back in the UK, where students will again be scanned for any evidence of changes in the brain which might indicate acute mountain sickness.
Jackson SJ, Varley J, Sellers C, et al Incidence and prevention of mountain sickness among trekkers on Mount Kilimanjaro.
Richard's aim was to shed light on the problem of acute mountain sickness which affects between a third and a half of visitors to Ladakh, many of them trekkers, walkers and climbers.
Specifically, HAI includes acute mountain sickness (AMS), high-altitude cerebral edema (HACE), and high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) (Table 1).
com opens with a general overview under the title "Altitude Illness Explained" and this elucidates on how to avoid acute mountain sickness with reference to causes and treatment.
Recently Steele--a Yukon-based physician and author--considered updating it to bring it more in line with what's now known about mountain sickness and other details.
Many people mistakenly believe that a headache at altitude is "normal" when it is actually Acute Mountain Sickness
Mountain sickness or high-altitude illnesses are names for cerebral and respiratory problems that occur shortly after ascent to high altitude.
Mountain sickness causes headaches, nausea and an all-around bad feeling that only gets better after the body adjusts to the lack of oxygen.
Diseases such as leishmaniasis, Lyme disease, and acute mountain sickness deserve mention in Section Two but are not currently discussed.