motor

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motor

 [mo´ter]
1. pertaining to motion.
2. a muscle, nerve, or center that effects movements.

mo·tor

(mō'ter),
1. In anatomy and physiology, denoting neural structures, that because of the impulses generated and transmitted by them, cause muscle fibers or pigment cells to contract or glands to secrete.
See also: motor cortex, motor endplate, motor neuron.
2. In psychology, denoting the organism's overt reaction to a stimulus (motor response).
[L. a mover, fr. moveo, to move]

motor

/mo·tor/ (mōt´er)
1. a muscle, nerve, or center that effects or produces motion.
2. producing or subserving motion.

motor

(mō′tər)
adj.
1. Causing or producing motion.
2. Relating to or being nerves that carry impulses from the nerve centers to the muscles.
3. Involving or relating to movements of the muscles.
4. Relating to an organism's overt reaction to a stimulus.

motor

Etymology: L, movere, to move
1 pertaining to motion, the body apparatus involved in movement, or the brain functions that direct purposeful activities.
2 pertaining to a muscle, nerve, or brain center that produces or subserves motion.

aphasia

Dysphasia Neurology Partial or total inability to understand or create speech, writing, or language due to damage to the brain's speech centers; loss of a previously possessed facility of language comprehension or production unexplained by sensory or motor defects or diffuse cerebral dysfunction Etiology Stroke, brain disease, injury; anomia–nominal or amnesic aphasia and impaired ability to communicate by writing-agraphia are usually present in all forms of aphasia. See Broca's/Motor aphasia, Sensory/Wernicke's aphasia, Tactile aphasia.
Aphasia
Motor
Broca's aphasiaA primary deficit in language output or speech production, which ranges in severity from the mildest, cortical dysarthria, characterized by intact comprehension and ability to write, to a complete inability to communicate by lingual, phonetic, or manual activity
Sensory
Wernicke's aphasiaPts with sensory aphasia are voluble, gesticulate, and totally unaware of the total incoherency of their speech patterns; the words are nonsubstantive, malformed, inappropriate–paraphasia Sensory aphasia is characterized by 2 elements: Impaired speech comprehension–due largely to an inability to differentiate spoken and written phonemes–word elements-due to either involvement of the auditory association areas or separation from the 1º auditory complex Fluently articulated but paraphasic speech, which confirms the major role played by the auditory region in regulating language
Total
Global aphasia, complete aphasiaA form of aphasia caused by lesions that destroy significant amounts of brain tissue, eg occlusion of the middle cerebral or left internal carotid arteries, or tumors, hemorrhage, or other lesions; total aphasia is characterized by virtually complete impairment of speech and recognition thereof; afflicted Pts cannot read, write, or repeat what is said to them; although they may understand simple words or phrases, rapid fatigue and verbal and motor perseverence, they fail to carry out simple commands; total aphasia of vascular origin is almost invariably accompanied by right hemiplegia, hemianesthesia, hemianopia of varying intensity
.

mo·tor

(mō'tŏr)
1. anatomy, physiology Denoting those neural structures that, by the impulses generated and transmitted by them, cause muscle fibers or pigment cells to contract, or glands to secrete.
See also: motor cortex, motor endplate, motor neuron
2. psychology Denoting the overt reaction of an organism to a stimulus (motor response).
3. Pertaining to a set of skills involving movement or motion.
[L. a mover, fr. moveo, to move]

motor

1. Causing movement.
2. Carrying nerve impulses that stimulate muscles into contraction or cause other responses such as gland secretion. From the Latin movere , to move.

motor

relating to the stimulus of an EFFECTOR organ.

Motor

Of or pertaining to motion, the body apparatus involved in movement, or the brain functions that direct purposeful activity.

mo·tor

(mō'tŏr)
In anatomy and physiology, denoting those neural structures that, because of the impulses generated and transmitted by them, cause muscle fibers or pigment cells to contract or glands to secrete.
[L. a mover, fr. moveo, to move]

motor,

n pertaining to a muscle, nerve, or center that produces or affects movement.
motor neuron,
n one of the various efferent nerve cells that transmit nerve impulses from the brain or from the spinal cord to muscular or glandular tissue.
motor neuron disease,
n a progressive disease that tends to affect middle-age men with degeneration of anterior horn cells, motor cranial nerve nuclei, and pyramidal tracts (e.g., amyotrophic lateral sclerosis).
motor output,
n the activity that results from the integrative phenomena associated with brain activity. It is expressed in function as muscle contraction of the smooth and striated muscle and as secretion of the exocrine and endocrine glands and, in effect, represents the total behavioral activity. Whereas sensory phenomena have many avenues that feed into the brain, motor activity is expressed in terms of the simple, direct state of muscle contraction and glandular secretion. Thus muscle activity is expressed in terms of locomotion, hand-learned skills, speaking, mastication, and all forms of activity that involve motion.
motor pathway,
n all reflex actions of muscle are achieved by the passage of nerve impulses through the final common pathway–the muscle fibers. The lower motor neuron (the motor route of the cranial nerve) is the final pathway for the structures that are innervated by the cranial nerves. Impulses traverse these nerves to their respective muscles from every level of the spinal cord, hindbrain, midbrain, and cerebral cortex. The cranial motor neurons collate these multiple stimuli and transmit sequences of stimuli to the motor end-plate, which in the normal muscle effects a smooth, continuous, controlled contraction.
motor skill,
n the ability to make the purposeful movements that are necessary to complete or master a prescribed task.
motor unit,
n the entity consisting of the lower motor neuron, motor end-plate, and muscle fibers supplied by the end-plate. The final motor activity resulting from a sequence of stimulations to the lower motor neuron is considered a function of the motor unit. The proportion of nerve fibers to the muscle fibers in motor units is designated as the innervation ratio. They may have ratios ranging from 1:4 to 1:150. The closer the ratio approximates unity, the greater the finesse of specificity of the muscular action. The eye muscles have the highest ratio of striated muscles, and the tongue, facial, masticatory, and pharyngeal muscles succeed in that order.

motor

1. pertaining to motion.
2. a muscle, nerve or center that effects movements.

motor activity
limb movement the most obvious of these forms of activity.
motor alpha-neuron
ventral spinal cord neurons which innervate skeletal muscle. Called also final common pathway, lower motor neuron.
motor depressant anticonvulsant
a drug that depresses motor activity and hence prevents convulsions, e.g. phenobarbital sodium, phenytoin sodium.
motor dysfunction
abnormality of the motor system.
motor end-plate
sites of neuraptic transmission of acetylcholine from nerve to muscle receptors.
motor fibers
innervate the body effectors.
motor lubricating oil
ingestion may cause lead poisoning.
motor nerve conduction
the transmission of impulses along motor nerves to skeletal muscle.
motor unit
includes the motor neuron, neuromuscular junction, and the myofibrils innervated by the neuron.
motor unit action potential
the electrical activity of voluntary muscle contractions recorded by needle electromyography.
References in periodicals archive ?
This reduction of motor activity has been also described in other studies with male mice (Navarro et al.
Of the 13 temperamental traits assessed by the instrument, we administered the five traits (63 items) that show the highest relation with anxiety symptomatology, according to the bibliographical review carried out: level of motor activity, anger/frustration, discomfort, self-soothing, and fearfulness.
Abbreviations: ADL = activities of daily living, AOU = amount of use, ARA = Action Research Arm (test), CIMT = constraint-induced movement therapy, FIM = Functional Independence Measure, MAL = Motor Activity Log, NIHSS = National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale, QOM = quality of movement, UL = upper limb, VECTORS = Very Early Constraint Treatment for Recovery from Stroke, WMFT = Wolf Motor Function Test.
Typically, if you sy you want to know the relationship between motor activity and attention, someone will say, 'Babies that are fidgety just don't pay attention to very much,"' Robertson explains.
Teeter offers evidence that in children with ADHD, however, brain anomalies may predispose the infant to negative mood, withdrawal from or rejection of the caretaker, irregular patterns of sleeping, eating, and eliminating, aberrant motor activity etc.
To accomplish this, we monitored the motor activity of individual leeches under imposed light dark (LD) cycles or in constant darkness (DD) using time lapse video recording.
We are the only group that knows, through our experimental work, what the D4 receptor does, which activation causes decreased motor activity, because it would be acting in this special kernel that controls attention and partly motor activity'" Aceves Ruiz said.
Procurement Specific Motor Activity of the Company: Backhoe (3 Pieces) and Front End Loader with Bucket (1 Pc).
The new findings, from studies of nerve cells in the striatum (an area of the brain involved in motor activity and higher brain function), reveal a point on the KOR signaling pathway that may prove to be an important indicator of whether drug candidates can produce effects similar to the natural biological effects.
Minocycline, but not ascorbic acid, increases motor activity and extends the life span of drosophila melanogaster.
15, 2012 issue of NeuroImage suggests that engaging in an intense effort to learn a new language over a short period of time stimulates growth in the hippocampus, the brain region involved in learning, memory and spatial navigation, and in three areas of the cerebral cortex related to language-learning and motor activity.
Mice exposed to paraquat or maneb, either alone or in combination, showed a sustained decrease in motor activity only in the combined exposure groups, with increased striatal dopamine and dopamine metabolite levels immediately postinjection, decreasing after 7 days, and reduced levels of tyrosine hydroxylase and DAT in the dorsal striatum (Thiruchelvam et al.