motif

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motif

(mō-tēf′)
n.
1.
a. A recurrent thematic element in an artistic or literary work.
b. A dominant theme or central idea.
2. Music A short rhythmic or melodic passage that is repeated or evoked in various parts of a composition.
3. A repeated figure or design in architecture or decoration.
4. A recurrent pattern either of molecular sequence, usually of nucleotides or amino acids in proteins, or of molecular structure that usually corresponds to specific biological activity.

motif

A short, conserved cluster of amino acids or nucleotides which share structural and usually functional similarity on a macromolecule; a 3-dimensional structure of gene product/protein with known or implied functions, often inferred from the cDNA sequence.

Protein motifs
DNA binding, leucine zipper, membrane spanning, zinc finger.

motif

(of a PROTEIN) a specific combination of SECONDARY STRUCTURES exhibiting a characteristic three-dimensional structure and often associated with a particular function. For example, the coiled-coil motif, comprising of two or more helices wound around each other. This is found in the GLYCOPROTEIN of EBOLA VIRUS and has a role in entry of the virus into host cells. Also the ZINC FINGER which comprises of an α helix and two β strands forming a finger-like structure held together by a zinc ion.

motif

for proteins a three-dimensional structural unit formed by a particular sequence of amino acids, found in proteins and which is often linked with a particular function. For nucleic acids a particular, usually short, nucleotide sequence that forms a recognition site usually to which other proteins bind.

structural m's
in proteins, certain specific orderings of secondary structure that may have a functional role and include β-α-β helix-turn-helix, leucine zippers, calcium binding EF hands, zinc fingers and longer orderings that take on a structural domain such as the β-barrel and the immunoglobulin fold.

Patient discussion about motif

Q. What other illnesses are similar to asthma? I am 45 years old. My doctor suspects I might have adult asthma but there has yet been a final diagnosis made. What other problems might this be?

A. Before diagnosing someone as asthmatic, alternative possibilities should be considered. A clinician taking a history should check whether the patient is using any known bronchoconstrictors (substances that cause narrowing of the airways, e.g., certain anti-inflammatory agents or beta-blockers). Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which closely resembles asthma, is correlated with more exposure to cigarette smoke, an older patient, and decreased likelihood of family history of atopy. Your physician should examine these possibilities as well before diagnosing.

More discussions about motif
References in classic literature ?
Ay, but I have only one motive in life, Miss Trotwood,' he rejoined, smiling.
Men of this class, whether the favorites of a king or of a people, have in too many instances abused the confidence they possessed; and assuming the pretext of some public motive, have not scrupled to sacrifice the national tranquillity to personal advantage or personal gratification.
I am still in the dark about you and your motives," he said.
Having admitted this, may I count on receiving your permission to explain the motive of my visit?
In this, believe me, I was actuated by no motives of revenge for the occasional annoyances I had lately sustained from him, - nor yet by any feeling of malevolent enmity towards Miss Wilson, but purely by the fact that I could not endure that such a woman should be Mrs.
While search is being made for the criminal, we had better try to find out the motive for the crime; that will advance us a little," he said.
The belief that a motive is normally conscious makes it easier to be mistaken as to our own motives than as to other people's.
The vindictive motive had mingled itself all along with my other and better motives, and I confess it was a satisfaction to me to feel that the surest way, the only way left, of serving Laura's cause, was to fasten my hold firmly on the villain who had married her.
The first part of it referred to Captain Wragge, and entered unreservedly into all necessary explanations relating to the man himself and to the motive which had brought him to Combe-Raven.
Neither did he call it a curious coincidence that true patriotism was HIS only motive too.
Rothschild; but as my motive in travelling to your capital would not have been for the pleasure of dabbling in stocks, I stayed away till some favorable chance should present itself of carrying my wish into execution.
Having no longer the motive of serving and protecting her, Alban must, nevertheless, have taken the journey to Northumberland.