motivational interviewing


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motivational interviewing

A form of directive, client-centered psychotherapy in which patients are encouraged to explore the discrepancies between what they hope to attain in their lives and how they currently live and behave. The therapist uses empathy while helping patients explore how change may positively affect their lives. Patients' natural resistance to change is accepted as normal and natural. Autonomy is fostered so that changes in speech and behavior are developed by the patient, not by the therapist. The technique is used in a variety of settings, including alcohol and drug rehabilitation.
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The material is divided into four sections, each discussing a process of motivational interviewing.
Motivational interviewing has been defined as a, "client-centered, directive method for enhancing intrinsic motivation to change by exploring and resolving ambivalence" (Hohman, 2012, Pg.
Keywords: motivational interviewing, self-assessment, Motivational Interviewing Treatment Integrity, Internet, online
Applying the four main elements of the spirit of motivational interviewing (partnership, evocation, acceptance, and compassion) to efforts to engage patients with behavioral health concerns;
Transforming the Conversation Through Motivational Interviewing
Interventions can range from brief counseling to motivational interviewing of adolescents at risk and finally referral to substance abuse specialists in the highest-risk groups.
A comprehensive search conducted in August 2014 identified all relevant randomised controlled trials evaluating the effects of motivational interviewing for smoking cessation.
Trainers reported that motivational interviewing (MI)-inconsistent behaviors were frequently perceived during training and believed to create barriers to learning.
Motivational interviewing (MI) is a useful approach for practitioners to help enhance patient interest and participation in their treatment (Rollnick, Miller, & Butler, 2008).
After identifying patients with high scores on the Alcohol, Smoking, and Substance Involvement Screening Test (ASSIST), the researchers randomized 528 patients to a brief negotiated interview (BNI), an adaptation of motivational interviewing (MOTIV), or a control group of no intervention.