motivational interview

motivational interview

Substance abuse A nonconfrontational counseling technique that may be used by a primary care giver to evaluate a substance–alcohol, illicit drug–abuser's receptiveness to treatment
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A performance evaluation interview is a good example of a motivational interview.
For example, Borsari and Carey (in press) randomly assigned mandated students to receive either a 60- to 90-minute motivational interview (BMI) or a 60- to 90-minute alcohol education session in which the student was provided information about alcohol and its effects.
Following completion of a screening questionnaire, pregnant women who reported any recent alcohol consumption were randomly assigned to either a motivational interview or an information-based intervention.
Most of the teens in the study used the Project CATCH-IT website, including 90 percent of those assigned to the longer motivational interview with their doctor.
The initial phase of the intervention is a motivational interview conducted by a primary care provider, during which the patient is encouraged to identify his or her goals and to understand the potential impact of depression on attaining those goals.
Published in the January 2005 issue of Drug and Alcohol Dependence, a study conducted by researchers at Boston University involved an intervention group in which participants received a motivational interview with a substance abuse outreach worker, referrals to treatment programs, a written list of treatment options, and a follow-up telephone call after 10 days.
A key concept in any motivational interview is that patients are unlikely to change their behavior unless they are ready to change.
In a motivational interview, the therapist should avoid closed-end leading questions such as, "Don't you know that alcohol is bad for you?
Objective : PRECIOUS: PREventive Care Infrastructure based On Ubiquitous Sensing will provide a preventive care system to promote healthy lifestyles, which is comprised of three components: (1) transparent sensors for monitoring user context and health indicators (food intake, sleep and activity) deliver ambient data about current user behaviour; (2) users are represented by individual virtual models which allow inferring health risks and desired behavioural changes; (3) state-of-the-art motivational techniques originating especially from gamification and motivational interview trigger a set of feedback tools to change the user habits toward more healthy conduct.
This division will be based on the wishes of participants, motivational interview and results of diagnostic work.
Each teen chose the location and frequency of the motivational interview sessions, and chose whether their parents attended.
It is expensive as its chief component is a person (or persons) trained in motivational interviews.