motivational conflict

motivational conflict

[mō′tivā′shənəl]
Etymology: L, movere, to move, alis, relating to, confluere, to come together
a conflict resulting from the arousal of two or more motives that direct behavior toward incompatible goals. Kinds of motivational conflict include approach-approach conflict, approach-avoidance conflict, and avoidance-avoidance conflict.
References in periodicals archive ?
It suggests the possibility of motivational conflict - conflict that might not be resolved in consistent behavior.
Opponents of extended-utility representations have argued that this sheds no light on motivation, negates the important conceptual distinction between moral and self-interested behavior, repudiates motivational conflict, is static (while the acquisition of norms is dynamic, historical, and socially dependent), ignores the role of moral rules in justifying behavior, and denies the fusion of means and ends in moral action [9; 10].
Appended material treats the relationship between paradigms and his "Forms," cognitive and motivational conflicts in the soul per the Republic, and the frequency of particular ("miso-") compounds in classical Greek literature.