two-factor theory

(redirected from motivation-hygiene theory)

two-factor theory

A theory on human motivation which holds that people do not work harder or more efficiently until internal or maintenance factors (“dissatisfiers”—e.g., salary, status, work conditions) are met; motivational factors (“satisfiers”), such as achievement, advancement and responsibility, act independently of maintenance factors to increase motivation.
References in periodicals archive ?
What's significant about the motivation-hygiene theory is the recognition that just because people are not dissatisfied doesn't necessarily mean that they are satisfied.
In Part II, he explains key concepts of Maslow's hierarchy of needs and Herzberg's motivation-hygiene theory and applies them to industry; material in this section is based on the author's thesis submitted to Oxford University for a higher research degree.
In his motivation-hygiene theory, American behavioural scientist Frederick Herzberg observed that certain factors in the workplace caused job satisfaction while a separate set of factors led to dissatisfaction.