baby talk

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baby talk

1 the speech patterns and sounds of young children learning to talk, characterized by mispronunciation, imperfect syntax, repetition, and phonetic modifications, such as lisping or stuttering. See also lallation.
2 the intentionally oversimplified manner of speech, imitative of young children learning to talk, used by adults in addressing children or pets.
3 the speech patterns characteristic of regressive stages of various mental disorders, especially schizophrenia.
The acquisition of language skills by a baby, which occurs in 5 overlapping stages
(1) phonation—humming with the mouth closed (up to 2 months)
(2) primitive articulation—use of tongue and jaw to form new sounds (1 to 4 months)
(3) expansion—squeals, screeches, whispers, seemingly exploring the range of sounds, pitch, and amplitude—e.g., growls, ‘raspberries’ (3 to 8 months)

(4) babbling—the formation of Baby’s first syllables—da-da-da-da, ma-ma-ma-ma, etc. (5 to 10 months)

(5) sophisticated babbling—the stringing together of various syllables and meaningless sounds which have the rhythm and pacing of real sentences (9 to 18 months)
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References in periodicals archive ?
Several studies have been carried out and all of them agree that motherese provides, very precociously, either newborns or some month of life babies with neural activation [29].
The most compelling aspects of Falk's arguments stem from support that elements of motherese mirror developmental precursors to language and parallel qualities of music.
They argue that the diminutive may have arisen in adult systems out of a reanalysis of language addressed to babies as language about small things: "the relatively more frequent use of reduplication in early child language and motherese may have been reinterpreted as implying a hypocoristic pragmatic use, and this implicature may have been reinterpreted as primary hypocoristic meaning" (p.
1977) noted that it is not clear whether or not motherese is a cause or an effect of learning language.
That, in addition to the well-documented case of infant-directed speech, or motherese as it has been called.
A este tipo de discurso se le ha denominado habla materna o habla dirigida a los ninos (del ingles motherese y baby talk).
They all benefit from modified input such as the caretaker speech, specifically mother talk or motherese for L1 learners and foreigner talk or teacher talk for L2 learners.
Is it necessary to employ "musical motherese," or simplification of musical materials, or do children employ their own ways of sequencing learning as their capacity for understanding develops?
As MT technology gets wider use in chat rooms and on e-commerce websites, Silberman suggests that "we could come to see the rules, algorithms, and corpora of machine translation as a kind of motherese," a way for us to transform language itself.