mosaic

(redirected from mosaicist)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mosaic

 [mo-za´ik]
a pattern made of numerous small pieces fitted together; in genetics, occurrence in an individual of two or more cell populations each having a different chromosome complement.

mo·sa·ic

(mō-zā'ik),
1. Inlaid; resembling inlaid work.
2. The juxtaposition in an organism of genetically different tissues; it may occur normally (as in lyonization, q.v.), or pathologically, as an occasional phenomenon. From somatic mutation (gene mosaicism), an anomaly of chromosome division resulting in two or more types of cells containing different numbers of chromosomes (chromosome mosaicism), or chimerism (cellular mosaicism).
[Mod. L. mosaicus, musaicus, pertaining to the Muses, artistic]

mosaic

/mo·sa·ic/ (mo-za´ik)
1. a pattern made of numerous small pieces fitted together.
2. in genetics, an individual or cell cultures having two or more cell lines that are karyotypically or genotypically distinct but are derived from a single zygote.
3. in embryology, the condition in the fertilized eggs of some species whereby the cells of early stages have developed cytoplasm which determines the parts that are to develop.
4. in plant pathology, a viral disease characterized by mottling of the foliage.

mosaic

(mō-zā′ĭk)
n.
Biology An individual exhibiting mosaicism.

mo·sa′i·cist (mō-zā′ĭ-sĭst) n.

mosaic

[mōzā′ik]
Etymology: L, Musa, goddess of the arts
1 an individual or organism that developed from a single zygote but that has two or more kinds of genetically different cell populations. Mosaicism may result from a mutation, crossing over, or, more commonly in humans, nondisjunction of chromosomes during early embryogenesis, which causes a variation in the number of chromosomes in the cells. The type of chromosomal aberration and the fraction of cells that are affected depend on the cleavage stage at which the causative event occurred. Because monosomic cells are nonviable, except in X monosomic conditions, most mosaic conditions caused by nondisjunction in humans represent a mixture of normal and trisomic cells, regardless of whether an autosome or the sex chromosomes are involved. The degree of clinical involvement depends on the type of tissue containing the abnormality and may vary from near normal to full manifestation of a syndrome, such as Down syndrome or Turner's syndrome. Compare chimera. See also monosomy, sex chromosome mosaic, trisomy.
2 a fertilized ovum that undergoes determinate cleavage. See also mosaic development. mosaicism, n.
Referring to a sharply-defined tesselated patchwork of one ‘jig-saw’-shaped pattern imposed upon another of different color, tissue apearance or radiologic density
Genetics An individual with 2 or more genotypically or karyotypically distinct cell lines, arising from a single zygote by somatic mutation, crossing-over, or nondisjunction during mitotic division, an event more common in older mothers
Example Normal female mammal heterozygous for different alleles on the X chromosome; because of X chromosome inactivation, such females consist of two cell types, each with a different X chromosome inactivated, which results in a minor, epigenetic difference, in contrast to mosaic Turner syndrome in which some cells have no X chromosome at all
Gynaecology The mosaic pattern refers to vascular changes of interconnecting vessels resulting in a cobblestone or honeycomb surface appearance by colposcopy. Because the pattern is often associated with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), a cervix with a mosaic pattern should be biopsied
Informatics A proprietary web browser (Mosaic), which was the first multiplatform browser for Macintosh, Windows, and UNIX. It was partially responsible for the Web’s explosive growth, but has long since faded into obscurity

mosaic

adjective A patchwork of one sharply-defined 'jig-saw'-shaped pattern imposed upon another of different color, tissue pattern or radiologic density noun Genetics An individual with 2 or more genotypically or karyotypically distinct cell lines, arising from a single zygote by somatic mutation, crossing-over, or nondisjunction during mitotic division. See Chimera, Freemartin Ob/Gyn A vascular change of interconnecting vessels resulting in a cobblestone or honeycomb surface appearance by colposcopy, the mosaic pattern is often associated with CIN and mandates biopsy.

mo·sa·ic

(mō-zā'ik)
1. Inlaid; resembling inlaid work.
2. The juxtaposition in an organism of genetically different tissues; it may occur normally (as in lyonization, q.v.), or pathologically, as an occasional phenomenon.
[Mod. L. mosaicus, musaicus, pertaining to the Muses, artistic]

mosaic

  1. any organism exhibiting a mixture of cells of different genetic makeup, such as a GYNANDROMORPH. See INACTIVE-X HYPOTHESIS. Plants showing this phenomenon are known as CHIMAERAS (1).
  2. a pattern of leaf-arrangement in a tree to maximize the exposure of the leaves to sunlight and thus the level of photosynthesis.

Mosaic

A term referring to a genetic situation, in which an individual's cells do not have the exact same composition of chromosomes. In Down syndrome, this may mean that some of the individual's cells have a normal 46 chromosomes, while other cells have an abnormal 47 chromosomes.

mosaic

a pattern made of numerous small pieces fitted together; in genetics, the occurrence in an animal of two or more cell populations, each having a different chromosome complement, e.g. XY/XXY mosaic.

mosaic animals
all the genotypes arise from a single zygotic genotype because of chromosomal loss or mitotic nondisjunction.
ecological mosaic
a pattern of interspersed ecosystems of similar size and on a recurring basis.
References in periodicals archive ?
In St Mary's, George's mosaicists experimented with many of the ideas about the nature of the new monarchy that were later to be perfected in the Cappella Palatina.
Aguatti was one of the earliest mosaicists to work in miniature during the late 18th and early 19th centuries using miniature 'smalti', the Italian name for minuscule pieces of enamel tesserae made in the Vatican workshops.
In this novel, the Renaissance mosaicists Francesco and Valerio Zuccati are falsely accused of using inferior materials in their work by workers selfishly motivated.
She uses the density to great advantage, convincingly reconstructing the pictorial syntax used by the mosaicists to express subtle gradations of meaning.
We are very excited to introduce Lexington's enthusiastic arts community to such well-known mosaicists from around the world.
Mr Thomas said that the technique is a radical step forward in how such patterns are made, 'Our system allows hobbyists to build authentic mosaic patterns in a remarkably short space of time whereas it's previously taken professional mosaicists days to complete a 40 sq cm floor tile, now you can build that same tile to the same professional quality in four hours or less.
Led by artist Kim Wozniak, a group of international mosaicists will come together in Chicago to create the work over the course of this year's show.
The Guild for the Florentine mosaicists was established by Francisco I di Medici in 1580 and a similar guild was established for the Roman mosaicists in 1579 in the Vatican to satisfy the demand for pilgrims for souvenirs.
The Roman mosaicists or micromosaicists derive their art form from classical Rome, as opposed to nature, using stone and fragment of glass.
In the last decades of the nineteenth century, Rousseau's work had been compared (both in seriousness and in jest) to the works of many different 'primitive' artists, including schoolchildren, Jean Fouquet, the Persians, the Italian primitives, Byzantine mosaicists and cave painters.