mortise

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Related to mortises: tenons

mor·tise

(mōr'tēs),
The seating for the talus formed by the union of the distal fibula and the tibia at the ankle joint.
[M.E., fr. O.Fr., fr. Ar. murtazz, fastened]

mortise

A depression, groove, or hole into which another anatomical structure fits.
References in periodicals archive ?
the joint behaved as a conventional mortise and tenon joint.
If you've milled the stiles perfectly 31/2 inches wide, and cut the mortises 23/8 inches deep, then the total length of the rails should be 341/4 inches.
In general, joints with tenons 15 mm in width and without tenon shoulder failed as a result of fracture of the tenon, whereas joints with tenons 15 mm in width and with tenon shoulder failed as a result of glue-line fractures, splitting of the tenon and indentation of mortise.
Each tenon was pegged in place after fitting into its respective mortise with a long oak dowel, drilled all the way through, most of which were still in place and were reused.
Knee braces are important structural elements in timber bents constructed with round mortise and tenon joints, as shown in Figure 1, not only because they provide resistance to horizontal wind loads (Karlsen 1967) but also because they can improve distribution of forces in the frame and permit the use of wider spans.
Front and back rail tenons were centered on the ends of the rails so that the corresponding leg mortises could be located a slightly greater distance from the end of the leg (Fig.
Commercially available loose tenon systems exist such that the mortises can be made with simple drilling or routing operations.
These specimens had 2-inch diameter mortises and end-distances of 1.
A door "blank" or "slab" is the raw material for this project: It's just a door without a jamb, mortises, holes or hardware.
5 cm) inches so that the minimum wall thickness of the mortises at the top and bottom of the posts was 0.
These grooves are also used as he mortises that accept the tenon ends of the stiles and rails.
Because most often the cross pins failed rather than the tenons, the potential withdrawal resistances of the tenons themselves, or, the walls of the mortises, whichever is greater, were not determined.