mortified


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mortified

Pathology
adjective Gangrenous, necrotic.

Vox populi
adjective Extremely embarrassed (i.e., “embarrassed to death”).

gan·gre·nous

(gang'grĕ-nŭs)
Relating to or affected with gangrene.
Synonym(s): mortified.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Mortified proves we're really all the same: awkward, all to-human and eagar to get laid.
But nothing can stay this perfect forever, and the squip starts to lead Jeremy to make some questionable choices, culminating in a humiliating public profession of his love for Christine, who, predictably, is mortified by his behavior.
The mortified physical directors at the Springfield Y were appalled by the intrusion of unchristian-like behavior in their gym, and even considered dropping the "rowdy" game from their program.
When Ivy goes out on her own, the only news of her comes in the form of cryptic postcards until she shows up, humiliated, mortified, and personally disillusioned, on her family's doorstep needing them to save her from herself and the violent man who insists that Ivy loves him and is determined to make her admit it.
Christy is mortified and vows to move on with her life; she returns the ring she wore for years back to Alex.
He is mortified, for example, that the security demands of the brief made it virtually impossible to pursue a naturally ventilated solution, and is conscious that government sponsored projects need to recognize the commercial vulnerability of the emerging practices they want to employ.
How mortified the kawaii Jimminy Cricket would be to see a bowl of stir-fried grasshopper (inago).
It's telling that many of the most vocal advocates of continued NASA manned flights are mortified at the idea of good-time Charlies like Tito, Shuttleworth, and 'N Sync star Lance Bass soiling the heavens.
Yet Jimmy Carter should be mortified to be connected in any way with the Clinton-era nuclear accord with North Korea, particularly considering North Korea's admission that it has clandestinely continued its nuclear weapons program.
And his closing description of a scene "on the outer limits of style" (in which Ondine, accused of being a "phony," thr ows a glass of Coca-Cola in the face of an unnamed girl Koch calls a "heavy") encircles the Baudelairean figure that he finds in Warhol the filmmaker: "The girl made the mistake of turning her mortified aggression into words.
But will their mortified kids be ready to share their lives and their space with their parents?