mortality


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mortality

 [mor-tal´ĭ-te]
the quality of being mortal.
2. the ratio of actual deaths to expected deaths.

mor·tal·i·ty

(mōr-tal'i-tē),
1. The state of being mortal.
2. Synonym(s): death rate
3. A fatal outcome.
[L. mortalitas, fr. mors (mort-), death]

mortality

/mor·tal·i·ty/ (mor-tal´it-e)
1. the quality of being mortal.
2. see death rate, under rate.
3. the ratio of actual deaths to expected deaths.

mortality

Etymology: L, mortalis, perishable
1 the condition of being subject to death.
2 the death rate, which reflects the number of deaths per unit of population in any specific region, age group, disease, or other classification, usually expressed as deaths per 1000, 10,000, or 100,000.

mortality

(1) Death, see there.
(2) Mortality rate, see there.

mortality

Death rate Epidemiology A health statistic that corresponds to the total number of deaths per unit time in a population divided by the population's number, ergo deaths/1000 population. See Infant mortality, Neonatal mortality, Operative mortality, Post-neonatal mortality, Proportionate mortality.
Mortality–data of interest
Leading causes of mortality–US Cardiovascular–ASHD and aneurysm disease 39%, CA 22%, CVAs 7.6%, accidents 4.6%, pneumonia or influenza 3%, lung disease 3%, DM-related 1.8%, suicide 1.4%, cirrhosis 1.3%, nephritis 1.0%, homicide 1.0%, etc to 100%
Mortality rate in viral infections Rabies 99%, HIV 50+%, Ebola 20-80%, HBV 3-5%, polio ± 0.1%
Mortality < age 19 Fatal injuries–MVAs 47%–33% occupants, 8% pedestrians, homicide 13%–usually firearms, suicide 9.6%–?:/, 4:1, drowning 9%–most common in those < age 4, 90% in residential pools, fire/burns 7%–most < age 4, black:white ratio, 3:1  

mor·tal·i·ty

(mōr-tal'i-tē)
1. The state of being mortal.
2. Synonym(s): death rate.
3. A fatal outcome.

mor·tal·i·ty

(mōr-tal'i-tē)
1. State of being mortal.
2. A fatal outcome.

mortality,

n the death rate.

mortality

1. the quality of being mortal.
2. death as a statistic.

embryonic mortality
see early embryonic mortality.
mortality rate
the death rate; the ratio of the total number of deaths to the total number of the population during a specified time period. Commonly used specific mortality rates include disease, case fatality, neonatal, perinatal and preweaning mortality rates.
The rate may also be expressed as a standardized rate, when it is stated as a ratio of the expected death rate in a standard group of animals. It may also be expressed as a proportional rate, when it is stated as a proportion of all of deaths due to all causes in the group.
References in periodicals archive ?
Among men with no or minimal comorbidity, adding ADT to radiotherapy actually increased overall mortality (hazard ratio, 1.
Also, black and American Indian and Alaska Native women experienced the highest postneonatal infant mortality rates of any groups, with death rates more than twice that of white women.
A new paper published in the International Journal of Epidemiology says that randomized controlled trials (the gold standard method of evaluation) show that few currently available screening tests for major diseases where death is a common outcome have documented reductions in disease-specific mortality.
The updated tables and mortality improvement scale reflect that private pension plan participants are, in fact, living longer," said Dale Hall, managing director of research for the SOA.
The new analysis used data from a range of sources--including vital registration data, sibling histories, census data, maternal mortality surveillance and verbal autopsies--to estimate levels of and trends in maternal mortality, identify the timing and key causes of maternal mortality, and make projections for 2030.
Recently, there has been a growing interest in mortality risk and its management in the scientific literature as well as in practice, especially due to the demographic development in most industrialized countries.
1,2,5,7,9,10] Such practice may overestimate the short-term mortality related to the surgical procedure itself.
This mortality table will be used by the life insurers to determine the minimum actuarial reserve for the insurance policyholders' liabilities for the purpose of solvency regulations as well as for financial reporting purpose.
Identifying peaks in admissions and mortality should assist targeted resource allocation at higher risk times.
The life insurance industry has various opinions on the definition of the mortality improvement assumption.
Mortality data were gathered from the "Human Mortality Database", (2) which provides both birth and death counts for 37 countries.
A retrospective trend analysis of breast cancer mortality was performed within three pairs of neighbouring European countries (Northern Ireland (UK) v.