mortality


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mortality

 [mor-tal´ĭ-te]
the quality of being mortal.
2. the ratio of actual deaths to expected deaths.

mor·tal·i·ty

(mōr-tal'i-tē),
1. The state of being mortal.
2. Synonym(s): death rate
3. A fatal outcome.
[L. mortalitas, fr. mors (mort-), death]

mortality

/mor·tal·i·ty/ (mor-tal´it-e)
1. the quality of being mortal.
2. see death rate, under rate.
3. the ratio of actual deaths to expected deaths.

mortality

Etymology: L, mortalis, perishable
1 the condition of being subject to death.
2 the death rate, which reflects the number of deaths per unit of population in any specific region, age group, disease, or other classification, usually expressed as deaths per 1000, 10,000, or 100,000.

mortality

(1) Death, see there.
(2) Mortality rate, see there.

mortality

Death rate Epidemiology A health statistic that corresponds to the total number of deaths per unit time in a population divided by the population's number, ergo deaths/1000 population. See Infant mortality, Neonatal mortality, Operative mortality, Post-neonatal mortality, Proportionate mortality.
Mortality–data of interest
Leading causes of mortality–US Cardiovascular–ASHD and aneurysm disease 39%, CA 22%, CVAs 7.6%, accidents 4.6%, pneumonia or influenza 3%, lung disease 3%, DM-related 1.8%, suicide 1.4%, cirrhosis 1.3%, nephritis 1.0%, homicide 1.0%, etc to 100%
Mortality rate in viral infections Rabies 99%, HIV 50+%, Ebola 20-80%, HBV 3-5%, polio ± 0.1%
Mortality < age 19 Fatal injuries–MVAs 47%–33% occupants, 8% pedestrians, homicide 13%–usually firearms, suicide 9.6%–?:/, 4:1, drowning 9%–most common in those < age 4, 90% in residential pools, fire/burns 7%–most < age 4, black:white ratio, 3:1  

mor·tal·i·ty

(mōr-tal'i-tē)
1. The state of being mortal.
2. Synonym(s): death rate.
3. A fatal outcome.

mor·tal·i·ty

(mōr-tal'i-tē)
1. State of being mortal.
2. A fatal outcome.

mortality,

n the death rate.

mortality

1. the quality of being mortal.
2. death as a statistic.

embryonic mortality
see early embryonic mortality.
mortality rate
the death rate; the ratio of the total number of deaths to the total number of the population during a specified time period. Commonly used specific mortality rates include disease, case fatality, neonatal, perinatal and preweaning mortality rates.
The rate may also be expressed as a standardized rate, when it is stated as a ratio of the expected death rate in a standard group of animals. It may also be expressed as a proportional rate, when it is stated as a proportion of all of deaths due to all causes in the group.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the reasons behind high newborn mortality rate, the report says that this is partly because newborn deaths are difficult to address with a single drug or intervention and they require a system-wide approach.
Conclusion: The temperature and mortality are strongly linked and this association strengthens with the decrease in age.
At this stage, it is hence important to explore the trend and determinants of under-5 mortality to reduce the vulnerability of child's survival.
Mortality from other causes continuously dropped over the study period, but SLE mortality dropped only between 1968 and 1975 before rising continuously for 24 years.
Although the in-hospital mortality continues to be higher in women
Mortality has been studied in terms of disease specific mortality, procedure specific mortality and more recently risk adjusted mortality.
Utilizing data collected from various sources (including the California Department of Public Health, the California State Controller's Office, the California Employment Development Department, and Rand California), the infant mortality rate (I), as well as the under-five mortality rate (U5), are regressed on per capita own-county public health spending (H), the average of per capita public health spending of neighbor-counties (NH), the unemployment rate (U), the number of physicians per 1000 population (MD), population density (PD), the percent of the population which is non-white (AW), the one-year lagged mortality rate (I(-1) or U5(-1)), and several fixed effects.
Conversely, among men with moderate or severe comorbidity, forgoing rather than receiving additive ADT decreased overall mortality (HR, 0.
In 2011-2013, infant mortality rates among black mothers ranged from a high of more than 14 deaths per 1,000 live births in Kansas to a low of nearly 7 per 1,000 live births in Massachusetts.
Evidence was evaluated on 16 screening tests for 9 major diseases where mortality is a common outcome.
Any kind of death within 1 month after RP or within 1 month of starting radiotherapy was defined as 30-day mortality.