morph

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morph

(môrf)
n.
One of various distinct forms of a species (such as color variant) or of an organism during different parts of its life cycle.

morphine

An opium alkaloid with potent analgesic effect that owes its narcotic properties to its unique aromatic ring structure.
 
Clinical findings
Euphoria, respiratory depression, drowsiness, nausea, vomiting, decreased GI motility, increased risk of addiction.

Route
Parenteral, oral.
 
Effects
Blocks pain signals to brain and spinal cord.
 
Uses
Relieves severe acute and chronic pain; facilitates induction of anaesthesia.

morph

any individual variant that constitutes a form of a polymorphic species.
References in periodicals archive ?
com), were chosen because actual predator calls used in the other trials might have elicited a ceiling effect, masking real differences between morphs in terms of their boldness.
cordata were visited by several species of hymenopterans, butterflies, flies and birds (Wolfe & Barrett 1988) whose preferences in collecting pollen or feeding on nectar among the floral morphs differed (Wolfe & Barrett 1987, 1989; Harder & Barrett 1993; Orth & Waddington 1997), even though the amount of nectar produced did not differ between morphs (Wolfe & Barrett 1987).
They found that reed warblers increased their mobbing, but only to the cuckoo morph that their neighbours had mobbed.
Meet the Morphs walks are at 11am and 2pm today and August 10.
It was hoping to make it into the Guinness Book of Records for gathering the most people in one place wearing Morph suits.
Summary: A flash mob of tiny Morph figures has been held to honour TV artist Tony Hart who died earlier this year.
The main difference between them is the Pro version provides key framing for defined paths for the morph dots to travel, which produces smoother morphs.
Moose (Alces alces) have evolved 2 main antler morphs (Collett 1912, Sckuncke 1949, Bubenik 1973, Rulker and Stalfelt 1986, Andersen and Saether 1996, Engan 1998).
Photo: Rachel morphs into a lion in ``The Capture,'' 8 p.
All populations exhibit a spectacular diversity of color morphs (plate 1 of Oxford and Gillespie 1996a).
In aphallic species, two sexual morphs co-occur in natural populations: regular hermaphrodites (euphallic individuals), and aphallic individuals that lack the male copulatory organ (Larambergue 1939).