morphology


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Related to morphology: sperm morphology

morphology

 [mor″fol´o-je]
1. the science of the form and structure of organisms.
2. the form and structure of a particular organism, organ, tissue, or cell. adj., adj morpholog´ic.

mor·phol·o·gy

(mōr-fol'ō-jē), Avoid the jargonistic use of this word as a synonym of form or appearance.
The science concerned with the configuration or the structure of animals and plants.
[morpho- + G. logos, study]

morphology

/mor·phol·o·gy/ (mor-fol´ah-je) the science of the forms and structure of organisms; the form and structure of a particular organism, organ, or part.morpholog´icmorpholog´ical

morphology

(môr-fŏl′ə-jē)
n. pl. morpholo·gies
a. The branch of biology that deals with the form and structure of organisms without consideration of function.
b. The form and structure of an organism or one of its parts: the morphology of a cell; the morphology of vertebrates.

mor′pho·log′i·cal (-fə-lŏj′ĭ-kəl), mor′pho·log′ic adj.
mor′pho·log′i·cal·ly adv.
mor·phol′o·gist n.

morphology

[môrfol′əjē]
Etymology: Gk, morphe + logos, science
the study of the physical shape and size of a specimen, plant, or animal. morphological, adj.

morphology

Linguistics
The formal study of morphemes.
 
Science
The science of the form and structure of organisms—plants, animals and other forms of life.

Vox populi
The appearance or shape of a thing.

anemia

Hematology A condition characterized by ↓ RBCs or Hb in the blood, resulting in ↓ O2 in peripheral tissues Clinical Fatigability, pallor, palpitations, SOB; anemias are divided into various groups based on cause–eg, iron deficiency anemia, megaloblastic anemia–due to ↓ vitamin B12 or folic acid, or aplastic anemia–where RBC precursors in BM are 'wiped out'. See Anemia of chronic disease, Anemia of investigation, Anemia of prematurity, Aplastic anemia, Arctic anemia, Autoimmune hemolytic anemia, Cloverleaf anemia, Congenital dyserythropoietic anemia, Dilutional anemia, Dimorphic anemia, Drug-induced immune hemolytic anemia, Fanconi anemia, Hemolytic anemia, Idiopathic sideroblastic anemia, Immune anemia, Iron-deficiency anemia, Juvenile pernicious anemia, Macrocytic anemia, Megaloblastic anemia, Microcytic anemia, Myelophthisic anemia, Neutropenic colitis with aplastic anemia, Nonimmune hemolytic anemia, Pseudoanemia, Refractory anemia with excess blasts, Sickle cell anemia, Sideroblastic anemia, Sports anemia.
General groups of anemia
Morphology
Macrocytic
Megaloblastic anemia
  • Vitamin B12deficiency
  • Folic acid deficiency
Microcytic hypochromic
  • Iron-deficiency anemia
  • Hereditary defects
  • Sickle cell anemia
  • Thalassemia
  • Other hemoglobinopathies
Normocytic
  • Acute blood loss
  • Hemolysis
  • BM failure
  • Anemia of chronic disease
  • Renal failure
Etiology
Deficiency
  • Iron
  • Vitamin B12
  • Folic acid
  • Pyridoxine
Central–due to BM failure
  • Anemia of chronic disease
  • Anemia of senescence
  • Malignancy
    • BM replacement by tumor
    • Toxicity due to chemotherapy
    • Primary BM malignancy, eg leukemia
Peripheral
  • Hemorrhage
  • Hemolysis
.

mor·phol·o·gy

(mōr-fol'ŏ-jē)
The science concerned with the configuration or the structure of animals and plants.
[morpho- + G. logos, study]

morphology

the study of the shape, general appearance or form of an organism, as distinct from ANATOMY which involves dissection to discover structure.

Morphology

Literally, the study of form. In medicine, morphology refers to the size, shape and structure rather than the function of a given organ. As a diagnostic imaging technique, ultrasound facilitates the recognition of abnormal morphologies as symptoms of underlying conditions.

morphology,

n method for classifying the body constitution type. See also constitution, carbonic; constitution, fluoric; constitution, phosphoric; and constitution, sulphuric.

mor·phol·o·gy

(mōr-fol'ŏ-jē)
The science concerned with the configuration or the structure of animals and plants.
[morpho- + G. logos, study]

morphology

(môrfol´əjē),
n the branch of biology that deals with the form and structure of an organism or part, without regard to function.
morphology, determinants of occlusal,
n.pl variable factors that determine the forms given to the crowns of teeth restored in metals, such as mandibular centricity; the intercondylar distance; the distance of teeth from the sagittal plane; the character of lateral and protrusive paths of the condylar axes; and the overlaps of the anterior teeth and wear.

morphology

the science of the forms and structure of organisms; the form and structure of a particular organism, organ, tissue or cell.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Influence of the Compounding Sequence on the Morphology of Hydrophilic Silica-Filled PCIPMMA Systems
In our laboratory we have effectively replaced one full-time employment (FTE) morphological expert technician with a digital morphology (DM) system over a four-year time period.
The studying the morphology properties of pollen grains from specific genotypes and cultivars are important for breeding programmes and germplasm.
Costs and limits of phenotypic plasticity: tests with predator-induced morphology and life history in a freshwater snail.
Reiling created Morphology Junior as a response to feedback from parents and families who said they were tinkering with the rules of Morphology to make it suitable for their youngest children.
Blood Cell Morphology: Grading Guide serves as a comprehensive reference for grading red blood cell abnormalities, white blood cell abnormalities, and platelet morphology.
Adequate management of karst aquifers requires knowledge of water flow through caves and conduits, including location, size and morphology of the complex interconnected voids.
Despite it not being comprehensive, this chapter is of real value to the field of Aramaic studies, in which discussions of Babylonian and Neo-Aramaic historical morphology are lacking.
Battelle Memorial Institute (Richland, WA) has patented isolated gene regulatory elements and gene transcription terminators that are differentially expressed in a native fungus exhibiting a first morphology relative to the native fungus exhibiting a second morphology.
Patients were matched for age, number of eggs transferred and percentage of normal sperm morphology.
The measuring data are said to supply reliable information about the phase morphology of the material tested.