morphogenesis


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morphogenesis

 [mor″fo-jen´ĕ-sis]
the developmental changes of growth and differentiation occurring in the organization of the body and its parts. adj., adj morphogenet´ic.

mor·pho·gen·e·sis

(mōr'fō-jen'ĕ-sis),
1. Differentiation of cells and tissues in the early embryo that establishes the form and structure of the various organs and parts of the body.
2. The ability of a molecule or group of molecules (particularly macromolecules) to assume a certain shape.
[morpho- + G. genesis, production]

morphogenesis

/mor·pho·gen·e·sis/ (mor″fo-jen´ĕ-sis) the evolution and development of form, as the development of the shape of a particular organ or part of the body, or the development undergone by individuals who attain the type to which the majority of the individuals of the species approximate.

morphogenesis

(môr′fō-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
Formation of the structure of an organism or part; differentiation and growth of tissues and organs during development.

mor′pho·ge·net′ic (-jə-nĕt′ĭk), mor′pho·gen′ic adj.
mor′pho·ge·net′i·cal·ly adv.

morphogenesis

[môr′fəjen′əsis]
Etymology: Gk, morphe + genein, to produce
the development and differentiation of the structures and form of an organism, specifically the changes that occur in the cells and tissue during embryonic development. Also called morphogeny [môrfoj′ənē] .

morphogenesis

The constellation of biological processes that determine an organism’s shape, which is inextricably intertwined with cell growth and differentiation, the other key elements of developmental biology.

mor·pho·gen·e·sis

(mōr'fō-jen'ĕ-sis)
1. Differentiation of cells and tissues in the early embryo that establishes the form and structure of the various organs and parts of the body.
2. The ability of a molecule or group of molecules (particularly macromolecules) to assume a certain shape.

morphogenesis

The origin and development of the form and structure of the body.

morphogenesis

the development of the form or structure of an organism during the life history of the individual.

mor·pho·gen·e·sis

(mōr'fō-jen'ĕ-sis)
1. Differentiation of cells and tissues in early embryo that establishes form and structure of various organs and parts of the body.
2. Ability of a molecule or group of molecules to assume a shape.

morphogenesis,

n the development and differentiation of the structures and the form of an organism, specifically the changes that occur in the cells and tissue during embryonic development.

morphogenesis

the developmental changes of growth and differentiation occurring in the organization of the body and its parts.
References in periodicals archive ?
These differences result in distinct patterns of epithelial morphogenesis such that the oviduct infundibulum and ampulla consist largely of ciliated epithelial cells, whereas the isthmus has more secretory cells.
scolopes, and experimentally manipulated the delivery of the morphogenic signal to determine whether the hemocytes are involved in the induction of other hallmarks of light organ morphogenesis.
Many studies have reported the stimulating effect of cytokinin on in vitro floral morphogenesis, but they were species-dependent [8, 18, 14, 19, 20].
Fundamentals and applications of light-emitting diodes (LEDs) in in vitro plant growth and morphogenesis.
The effect of androgen deprivation on branching morphogenesis in the mouse prostate.
In vitro morphogenesis has developed a significant importance in plant biotechnology (Vasil, 2008; Shah et al.
The bottom-up morphogenesis or origin of colonic adenomas has been morphologically characterized by Lane et al, (4) with further molecular evidence from Preston et al.
19 RAR-a and RAR- play a role in epidermal dermal interactions that lead to hair follicle morphogenesis.
Concluding chapters cover normal and abnormal morphogenesis, genetics and genetic counseling, minor anomalies and their relevance, a clinical approach to diagnosis, and normal standards of measurement for different features.
The association between the Hawaiian bobtail squid, Euprymna scolopes, and its luminous gram-negative symbiont, Vibrio fischeri, provides a unique system in which to study developmental morphogenesis.
reports the fully functional regeneration of a salivary gland that reproduces the morphogenesis induced by reciprocal epithelial and mesenchymal interactions through the orthotopic transplantation of a bioengineered salivary gland germ as a regenerative organ replacement therapy.
This work was centered on exploring the role of a protein called FAK in the development of the embryo and specifically its role in morphogenesis.