morpheme

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mor·pheme

(mōr'fēm),
The smallest linguistic unit with a meaning.
[G. morphē, form + -eme, from phoneme, G. phēmē, utterance]

morpheme

The smallest semantically meaningful unit of a spoken language (words, prefixes or suffixes) that have discrete meanings. The formal study of morphemes is termed morphology.

morpheme

(mor'fem)
The smallest meaningful grammatical unit in a language (e.g., the s in “beds”).
See: phoneme

morpheme

The smallest element of speech that conveys either factual or grammatical information. Compare with phoneme which is a speech sound that serves to distinguish one word from another.
References in periodicals archive ?
Harris, Schumaker, and Deshler (2011) conducted a vocabulary study with high school students with and without learning disabilities using a morphemic analysis strategy for analyzing and predicting the meaning of words.
Libben (2010) also discusses how inhibition and facilitation might arise from morphemic representations.
At each and every level of language, therefore, phonetic, morphemic, syntactic, semantic, pragmatic, etc.
Phonologically, the phoneme /m/ of the morpheme <-mna> occurs in the coda position and keeps itself away from its morphemic group.
This study tested the effects of teaching high school students with learning disabilities (LD) and other students enrolled in general education classes a morphemic analysis strategy for analyzing and predicting the meaning of words.
Key words: Code-switching, Agreement, Urdu/Hindi-English, Intra-clausal, Intra-phrasal, morphemic.
While breadth refers to the amount of words known, depth of word knowledge includes all word characteristics such as phonemic, graphemic, morphemic, syntactic, semantic, collocational and phraseological properties (Quian, 2002).
Also, our beliefs which sometimes constitute our identity as well as our value system, are so vital to our existence that not having a structured language with "its semantic, syntactic, phonetic, morphemic and semiotic dimensions"(Ozumba 2004: 18) can mar its existence, continuity and even its meaningfulness.
No phonemic, morphemic, syntactic, or semantic parsing of any utterance depicts the workings of language in the brain, any more than parsing an event into seconds, minutes, and hours depicts the workings of time in the brain.
In such cases, the language learner compulsively resorts to shifts of expression ranging from morphemic to textual dimension.
Standard I, Language Learning and Literacy Development, addresses emergent literacy, phonological and phonemic awareness, phonics and structural analysis, sight vocabulary, morphemic analysis, and research-based instructional practices for developing accurate and automatic decoding.