morphea


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Related to morphea: Linear scleroderma, generalized morphea

morphea

 [mor-fe´ah] (Gr.)
a type of localized scleroderma in which connective tissue replaces the skin and sometimes subcutaneous tissues, with formation of ivory white or pink patches, bands, or lines that are sometimes bordered by a purple areola. The lesions are firm but not hard and are usually depressed; they may remain localized or may involute, leaving atrophy and scarring. Called also circumscribed or localized scleroderma.
linear morphea linear scleroderma.

mor·phe·a

(mōr-fē'ă),
Cutaneous lesion(s) characterized by indurated, slightly depressed plaques of thickened dermal fibrous tissue of a whitish or yellowish-white color surrounded by a pinkish or purplish halo. Lesions occur at any age, without systemic involvement, and usually resolve after a few years.
[G. morphē, form, figure]

morphea

/mor·phea/ (mor-fe´ah) a condition in which there is connective tissue replacement of the skin and sometimes the subcutaneous tissues, with formation of firm ivory white or pinkish patches, bands, or lines.

morphea

[môr′fē·ə]
Etymology: Gk, morphe, form
a skin disease consisting of patches of yellowish or ivory-colored hard, dry, smooth skin. It is more common in females. Also spelled morphoea. Also called Addison's keloid, circumscribed scleroderma, localized scleroderma.

morphea

 A condition characterized by subcutaneous sclerosis, divided by some authors into
1. A generalized form: Scleroderma and.
2. A localized form, subdivided into (a) Circumscribed morphea–characterized by one or more round-to-oval firm reddish plaques measuring up to several centimeters in diameter with a yellow-white center and a lilac telangiectatic border; (b) Linear morphea or linear scleroderma; (c) Frontoparietal lesions–en coup de sabre with or without hemiatrophy of the face.

mor·phe·a

(mōr-fē'ă)
Cutaneous lesion(s) characterized by indurated, slightly depressed plaques of thickened dermal fibrous tissue, of a whitish or yellowish white color surrounded by a pinkish or purplish halo.
Synonym(s): localized scleroderma, morphoea.
[G. morphē, form, figure]

Morphea

The most common form of localized scleroderma.
Mentioned in: Scleroderma

morphea

see canine localized scleroderma.
References in periodicals archive ?
As a result of clinical, pathological evaluation and laboratory examination, the patient was diagnosed with circumscribed morphea (localized scleroderma).
Materials and Methods: Fourteen pediatric morphea patients, 3 males and 11 females under the ageof 18, followed up at Uludag University, Medical Faculty, Dermatovenereology Department between 2000-2010 were enrolled in the study Inclusion criterion was age under 18 years at diagnosis.
In addition to the 89% rate of continued disease activity, other particularly noteworthy study findings included the fact that 5 of the 27 patients developed one or more new-onset autoimmune diseases as adults, 15 adults had permanent functional impairment due to their morphea, and 21 had neurologic and/ or musculoskeletal symptoms, added Dr.
The most common type of morphea involves scarlike oval patches of skin called plaques.
Generalized morphea is characterized by cutaneous sclerosis plaques caused by excessive collagen deposition, which leads to thickening of the dermis and/or subcutaneous tissues.
The diagnosis of anogenital lichen sclerosus can usually be made clinically; however, several inflammatory dermatoses can occur in the anogenital area: lichen planus, cicatricial pemphigoid, lichen simplex, morphea, and eczema.
Wolf's isotopic response: zosteriform morphea appearing at the site of healed herpes zoster in a HIV patient.
ABANO TERME, ITALY -- The unexpected finding of increased rates of diabetes in patients with morphea suggests that metabolic factors may be involved in triggering the condition, Dr.
Interstitial mycosis fungoides, a variant of mycosis fungoides resembling granuloma annulare and inflammatory morphea.
Extragenital lichen sclerosus must be differentiated from guttate morphea and lichen planus.
Representatives from the University of Texas Scleroderma Family Registry and DNA Repository and the University of Texas Southwestern Morphea Registry and DNA Repository will be at the conference seeking interested individuals to serve as donors and controls for scleroderma research.
Basaloid follicular hamartoma in a linear distribution may mimic linear epidermal nevus, lichen striatus, linear morphea, and basal cell nevus.