mores


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mo·res

(mo'rāz), This word is grammatically plural.
A concept used in the behavioral and social sciences to refer to centrally important and accepted folkways, and cultural norms that embody the fundamental moral views of a group.
[L. pl. of mos, custom]

mores

(mō′rāz) [L.]
Habits and customs of society; usually those that come to be regarded as being essential to the survival and well-being of the society.
References in periodicals archive ?
Sharing a commitment to superior quality, academic excellence and patient safety, the organizations within Northwestern Medicine comprise more than 9,000 clinical and administrative staff, 3,100 medical and science faculty and 700 students.
It should clearly show how application of MoRES can help to improve the lives of the most disadvantaged children.
In our post-Dolly era this line of reasoning is becoming ever more pervasive in the mind of the public.
Hitler was crushed and the ethical allied victors rebuilt Germany into the more ethical nation.
According to Fransen, Augustine was the first to use the phrase fides et mores in two letters to a layman named Januarius who was deeply worried about the liturgy and practice of Christian life in the Church.
The ruling Saudi elite opposes political globalization because they fear it will bring the menace of more democracy and an open society.
Focusing on downstairs dinnerware, Mores latest designs for Block, different from Nikko's more scenic ones, include three hand-painted designs with raised pigments for added visual interest.
In this century, few names evoke more ire in free market circles than those of John Kenneth Galbraith and Ralph Nader.
For this argument to take, he must show that Luther was more profoundly influenced by humanist (political) thought than many recent Luther scholars have been willing to accept (e.
Not least, sexual mores are in flux, eroding a world in which the rules for mating and family life were clear.
With men approaching women (or vice versa) in this manner, "there's always a risk that the person might read more into your gesture than was intended," warns Antoinette Broussard, a San Francisco-based protocol and etiquette consultant.
how one of "our families" had gotten through some genuinely frightening hours, and how their feelings about the curfew and the fearsome rioting could still accommodate more than one point of view.