MORE

(redirected from moreover)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to moreover: furthermore

MORE

Abbreviation for:
Multiple Outcomes of Raloxifene Evaluation

MORE

Osteoporosis A clinical trial–Multiple Outcomes of Raloxifene Evaluation–that evaluated the effect of raloxifene on ↓ fracture risk in ♀, and the secondary impact of raloxifene therapy on ♀ cancer. See Osteoporosis, Raloxifene.
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
Moreover, he was treacherous and a liar, and these Chaka was not.
The same quality, moreover, is said to subsist in a thing in varying degrees at different times.
Nor is it, moreover, right to permit written laws always to remain without alteration; for as in all other sciences, so in politics, it is impossible to express everything in writing with perfect exactness; for when we commit anything to writing we must use general terms, but in every action there is something particular to itself, which these may not comprehend; from whence it is evident, that certain laws will at certain times admit of alterations.
All these details which we here lay bare for the edification of the reader, were so covered by the general uproar, that they were lost in it before reaching the reserved platforms; moreover, they would have moved the cardinal but little, so much a part of the customs were the liberties of that day.
Moreover, if I mistake not, we will find sweet faring within.
Moreover, on examining the eggs that she had laid he found they were just like any other eggs.
Moreover, she was denied the happiness of repeating her poems.
1) In diction, dialect and style it is obviously dependent upon Homer, and is therefore considerably later than the "Iliad" and "Odyssey": moreover, as we have seen, it is in revolt against the romantic school, already grown decadent, and while the digamma is still living, it is obviously growing weak, and is by no means uniformly effective.
Moreover, on this view, many species of distinct genera and families are supposed to combine for one end; and of such a combination, not a single instance can be found in the whole of nature.
In the first place, he is thought just, and therefore bears rule in the city; he can marry whom he will, and give in marriage to whom he will; also he can trade and deal where he likes, and always to his own advantage, because he has no misgivings about injustice and at every contest, whether in public or private, he gets the better of his antagonists, and gains at their expense, and is rich, and out of his gains he can benefit his friends, and harm his enemies; moreover, he can offer sacrifices, and dedicate gifts to the gods abundantly and magnificently, and can honour the gods or any man whom he wants to honour in a far better style than the just, and therefore he is likely to be dearer than they are to the gods.
He had exquisite manners, and bowed to the company on all sides; for he had noble blood, and was, moreover, accustomed to the society of man alone; and that makes a great difference.
Moreover, Sergey Ivanovitch's attitude to the peasants rather piqued Konstantin.