morcellate

morcellate

(mor′sĕ-lāt″) [Fr. morceler, to divide into small pieces]
To divide tissue into fragments or pieces for surgical removal.
morcellation (mor″sĕ-lā′shŏn)
References in periodicals archive ?
For complete containment, it appears to be important that we morcellate using a bag that has a single opening and is not punctured with accessory trocars.
Is it feasible to morcellate fibroids, as well as polyps, in the clinic?
The microbivore consisting of sufficient mechanical mincing power, digestion chamber where a pre-programmed sequence of engineered enzymes are successively injected and extracted, reducing the morcellate primarily to monoresidue amino acids, mononucleotides, glycerol, free fatty acids and simple sugars, which are then harmlessly discharged into the environment, completing the cycle.
org web site which reads: "Place an immediate moratorium on intracorporeal uterine morcellation during minimally invasive hysterectomy, on all gynecological tissue morcellation devices and any devices, used to morcellate the uterus intracorporeally in the United States and Abroad.
If fat is harvested via a cutaneous incision, it is necessary to remove the fibrous tissue and blood vessels and to morcellate the fat.
Perhaps the last tissue extractor remaining in the market should be used to morcellate the tort system and finally build a system that will protect patients and physicians.
It's not easier to do laparoscopic surgery, and it's certainly not easier to morcellate tissue.
However, the ability to safely morcellate a very large uterus or myoma may be limited by visualization, and the experience of the surgeon is often critical in the successful performance of these procedures.
I still believe that intuitively--and that's all we have is intuition here--that it more likely mitigates the risk of upstaging a tumor if you morcellate within a containment system, such as a bag.
I prefer to perform nonhysteroscopic cases using a laparoscopic approach, creating a small mini-laparotomy to remove the fibroid intact or using a knife to morcellate the tissue outside of the peritoneal cavity.
Prior to the focus on the risks of morcellation, a patient who was going to have a supracervical laparoscopic hysterectomy may not have been informed before her procedure about the possible need to morcellate.
In the meantime, my personal bias is to rule out risk factors for malignancy and continue to morcellate with a scalpel, preferably inside a bag.