morality

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morality

 [mo-ral´ĭ-te]
accordance with widely shared conventions of right or good conduct that form a stable, but usually incomplete, social consensus; it includes the concept of moral ideals. See also virtue.
principle-based common morality a type of ethical thinking based on premises that are unphilosophical common sense and tradition and come from the morality shared by members of a society. Principle-based theories have an emphasis on obligation and are pluralistic (in contrast to teleological and deontological theories, which are monistic, i.e., have one supreme, absolute principle supporting all other guides in the system). The principles are generally accepted in most types of ethical theory and are what are called “middle level” principles in that they are not the most general principles but are those likely to be acceptable to proponents of different normative theories. This type of thinking has been most influential in bioethics and in nursing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Luckly, no major damage seems to have occurred to the House of the Moralist.
The pastoral moralists were neither academics nor outsiders but rather individuals ministering to congregants engaged in the market economy.
Most of us, regardless of our political affiliation, are selective moralists we denounce the sins we don't commit, while dissembling about the ones we do.
He's a framer of laws like Moses or Newton; one part moralist on a mountain, the other part scientific explorer.
Well I'm sorry, but Ulrika and all those other celebrity whingers should get off their moralist high horses and admit they'd give their right arms to be earning pounds 15million and presenting one of TV's most success- ful-ever quiz shows.
Apart from being a stern fiscal moralist, Mr Brown is a son of the manse, and sons of the manse have been brought up from the cradle in the belief that racing is an activity which is of interest only to those who have set themselves on the road to ruin.
Greene argues that the great moralist elides the ethical and the aesthetic dimensions of language and thus achieves a perfect synthesis of Barthes's antagonistic figures of ecrivain and ecrivant.
The statesman and the moralist share "integrity," but the statesman's principles are moderated by a recognition of the character of politics and its responsibilities.
Perhaps to avoid being seen as merely a didactic, declarative moralist, Hebert's next few films are less overtly political and incorporate more improvisational elements, more open-ended structures.
The Value of Victorian Virtues The De-Moralization of Society: From Victorian Virtues to Modern Values by Gertrude Himmelfarb (Knopf) Maybe it's not so bad being a Victorian moralist after all.
An unbending moralist and a champion of the institution of marriage, Augier satirized adultery in Les Lionnes pauvres (1858; "The Poor Lionesses") and saw in greed the root of evil.
As a moralist, thinker, and poet, Shakespeare does indeed seem to be an artist so far above as to be an artist apart.