morality

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morality

 [mo-ral´ĭ-te]
accordance with widely shared conventions of right or good conduct that form a stable, but usually incomplete, social consensus; it includes the concept of moral ideals. See also virtue.
principle-based common morality a type of ethical thinking based on premises that are unphilosophical common sense and tradition and come from the morality shared by members of a society. Principle-based theories have an emphasis on obligation and are pluralistic (in contrast to teleological and deontological theories, which are monistic, i.e., have one supreme, absolute principle supporting all other guides in the system). The principles are generally accepted in most types of ethical theory and are what are called “middle level” principles in that they are not the most general principles but are those likely to be acceptable to proponents of different normative theories. This type of thinking has been most influential in bioethics and in nursing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fretting about the dangers of indolence, intemperance, and extravagance, the conservative moralists often overlooked the fact that many workers had incomes too inadequate and irregular to maintain the levels of decency that the genteel critics prescribed for them.
Virtues exhibited by people whom moralists judge good include the four basic virtues proposed by Aristotle:
Lisska's book provides a detailed explication of Thomistic natural law ethics, using categories taken from analytic philosophy in order to provide a moral theory that is clear and coherent enough to be persuasive to serious contemporary secular moralists.
In 1986 his selection of essays Kamrerns julafton was chosen by Bonniers as their Christmas book of the year, a very perceptive choice because Claesson--or "Slas," as is his signature--is not only a remarkable observer and moralist but also a skilled artist whose clever drawings illustrate his essays.
After all, Berry, the moralist, and Krassner, the libertine, are not merely opposites.
Lagerkvist was a moralist without a system of belief.
This will be an opportunity for listeners to hear from a host whom the Los Angeles Times describes as an "amazingly gifted man and moralist whose mission in life has been crystallized: to get people obsessed with what's right and wrong.
A moralist might immediately answer, "Absolutely not," believing that there is no choice but to run a health care business altruistically.
A prodigious writer, voracious reader, tireless speaker, endless talker, keen hunter, wily politician, stern moralist, and loving paterfamilias, the charismatic president was a dominating figure devoted to an incredibly strenuous physical and intellectual life.
MERCILESS CARICATURIST, gruesome fantasist, homoerotic moralist, and above all maker of wonderfully crafted drawings and paintings: Paul Cadmus worked in many modes throughout his life and created so many surprising and often disturbing varieties of art that even those most passionate about his work are seldom unequivocal in their assessments.
Dutch poet, translator, playwright, and moralist who was the first to set down humanist values in the vernacular.
But as his Oscar statement proved, he's really a moralist at heart.