morale


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morale,

n the mental state or condition as related to cheerfulness, confidence, and zeal.
References in periodicals archive ?
It boosts our morale because the President is a man of his words.
Emotional intelligence and morale are two important constructs.
Key words: Teachers' morale, Academic achievement, Secondary school, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa.
We know that generally morale is low across the country but to be in the lowest third nationwide suggests there may be a particular problem here.
This increased morale at DHS was the result of some very hard work, and is the largest increase of any Cabinet Department our size.
He acknowledged that work was needed to improve morale but claimed the BMA's actions over the contract dispute had made medics feel "devalued".
The Police Federation of England and Wales carried out the Pay and Morale Survey between April and June, and 31% of North Wales officers responded - a rise of 7%.
Improving and sustaining a high level of worker morale among cleaning workers improves productivity, reduces employee turnover, advances worker performance, and ensures customer satisfaction," explains Sambrowski
About 62 percent thought it had no impact on morale or productivity.
The document--"Reflections on the Morale of Priests"--acknowledged "a litany of concerns that weaken the morale of the nation's 53,000 priests.
Solomons, right, added: "What carried the boys through was their character and morale.
We were originally scheduled to deploy for nine months, and I knew that maintaining positive morale for such a long time would be one of those challenges.