morality

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morality

 [mo-ral´ĭ-te]
accordance with widely shared conventions of right or good conduct that form a stable, but usually incomplete, social consensus; it includes the concept of moral ideals. See also virtue.
principle-based common morality a type of ethical thinking based on premises that are unphilosophical common sense and tradition and come from the morality shared by members of a society. Principle-based theories have an emphasis on obligation and are pluralistic (in contrast to teleological and deontological theories, which are monistic, i.e., have one supreme, absolute principle supporting all other guides in the system). The principles are generally accepted in most types of ethical theory and are what are called “middle level” principles in that they are not the most general principles but are those likely to be acceptable to proponents of different normative theories. This type of thinking has been most influential in bioethics and in nursing.
References in periodicals archive ?
An apparent diastasis between two of John Locke's (1632-1704) most noted works, An Essay Concerning Human Understanding (henceforth Essay) and The Reasonableness of Christianity (ROC), concerning the epistemology of moral principles has caught the attention of Locke scholars in recent generations.
26) Does the moral reading entail that this judge should strike down laws that prohibit abortion, on the grounds that he accepts a moral principle to the effect that abortion is morally required?
The people and organizations involved with the National Climate Ethics Campaign call on everyone in the country to act on their moral principles now by rapidly and significantly reducing carbon pollution; by preparing for the consequences of climate change; and by demanding public policies that support those goals.
Nor does it follow that G or any other generalization is a moral principle.
This account and analysis of the IGOs' experience is both instructive and heartening: It shows that moral principles can be adopted as a guide in global governance in some organizations.
School counselors are expected to adhere to the moral principle of nonmaleficence when trying to make decisions about communicating confidential information.
Although these norms evolve through highly charged political struggles, many of them nonetheless remain rooted in the moral principles that initially motivated their creation.
But what is expanded is a metaphysical view about the structure of moral domain on which moral reasons present in particular cases are normatively prior to moral principles of any kind.
For at least the last fifty years, however, conservatives have followed Irving Babbitt in reclaiming the Lincoln who based his politics on universal moral principles but avoided demonizing his opponents or claiming supreme virtue for himself or his side.
Thus, a decision in a case may be justified by showing that it follows from moral principles that we (the justifiers) hold in reflective equilibrium.
That being the case, claims of pragmatic benefit need have no more appeal for irrealists than they have for realists, and irrealists need not choose a methodology for moral reasoning on the basis of its tendency to elicit moral principles that it would be useful for us to accept.
I ask the students, therefore, to reflect on the "acceptable" and "definitely wrong" lists, and see if they can formulate the core criteria or moral principles which underlie their choices.