ethics

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Related to moral laws: moralities

ethics

 [eth´iks]
1. a branch of philosophy dealing with values pertaining to human conduct, considering the rightness and wrongness of actions and the goodness or badness of the motives and ends of such actions.
2. systematic rules or principles governing right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession. adj., adj eth´ical.
applied ethics practical ethics.
descriptive ethics a type of nonnormative ethics that simply reports what people believe, how they reason, and how they act.
medical ethics the values and guidelines governing decisions in medical practice.
nonnormative ethics ethics whose objective is to establish what factually or conceptually is the case, not what ethically ought to be the case. Two types are descriptive ethics and metaethics.
normative ethics an approach to ethics that works from standards of right or good action. There are three types of normative theories: virtue theories, deontological theories, and teleological theories.
nursing ethics the values and ethical principles governing nursing practice, conduct, and relationships. The Code for Nurses, adopted by the American Nurses' Association (ANA) in 1950 and revised periodically, is intended to provide definite standards of practice and conduct that are essential to the ethical discharge of the nurse's responsibility. Further information on the Code, interpretative statements that clarify it, and guidance in implementing it in specific situations can be obtained from committees and councils on nursing practice of State Nurses' Associations or from the ANA Nursing Practice Department.
practical ethics the attempt to work out the implications of general theories for specific forms of conduct and moral judgment; formerly called applied ethics.
professional ethics the ethical norms, values, and principles that guide a profession and the ethics of decisions made within the profession.

eth·ics

(eth'iks),
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics

[eth′iks]
Etymology: Gk, ethikos, moral duty
the science or study of moral values or principles, including ideals of autonomy, beneficence, and justice. ethical, adj.

ethics

(1) The study of fundamental principles which define values and determine moral duties and obligations.
 
(2) Moral codes of practice concerned with: behaviour (moral conduct)—e. g. unprofessional behaviour, such as direct discrimination; legal, religious, social and personal concerns (moral issues); and debates within society—e.g. euthanasia vs. prolonging the life of a terminally-ill person.

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
1. The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong, with the moral consequences of human actions.
2. nursing Philosophy or code about what is ideal in human character and conduct; principles of right or wrong accepted by individual or group; study of morals and moral choices.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics

the principles of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of the health care professional, patients and colleagues

ethics (eˑ·thiks),

n the standards of conduct that direct a group or indi-vidual. In particular, it relates to the appropriate use of the power held by a group or individual.

eth·ics

(eth'iks)
The branch of philosophy that deals with the distinction between right and wrong and with the moral consequences of human actions.
[G. ethikos, arising from custom, fr. ethos, custom]

ethics (eth´iks),

n 1. the science of moral obligation; a system of moral principles, quality, or practice.
n 2. the moral obligation to render to the patient the best possible quality of dental service and to maintain an honest relationship with other members of the profession and mankind in general.
ethics, dental,
n See ethics, professional.
ethics, professional,
n the principles and norms of proper professional conduct concerning the rights and duties of health care professionals themselves and their conduct toward patients and fellow practitioners, including the actions taken in the care of patients and family members.

ethics

rules or principles which govern right conduct. Each practitioner, upon entering a profession, is invested with the responsibility to adhere to the standards of ethical practice and conduct set by the profession.

code of ethics
the written rules of ethics.
veterinary ethics
the values and guidelines governing decisions in veterinary practice.

Patient discussion about ethics

Q. The cobbler's shoes are never fixed A bit philosophical/ethical question: do you think it’s a appropriate to an alternative therapist to treat people with disease he or she has and can’t cure himself?

A. Even dietitian can suffer from depression and eat too much, or a gym coach that suffers from injury that prevents him or her from exercising. The knowledge and capabilities are not dependent on the specific situation of the therapist, not to mention the many explanations for such cases.

However, I do agree it may seem a bit suspicious…

More discussions about ethics
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead moral feeling is a response to the way the moral law itself relates, not to inclinations themselves, but to the principles or maxims to satisfy inclinations that Kant calls self-love and self-conceit.
85) His point is rather that forming habits "apart from any maxim," merely through imitating others, results in forming lasting inclinations by repeatedly gratifying them, which are "easier to acquire than to get rid of afterwards," and which do nothing to combat our propensity to prioritize satisfying inclinations over the moral law.
89) This would amount simply to developing habits if it were not, as it should be on Kant's view, a gradual response to the free revolution in one's intelligible character that established the moral law as one's fundamental maxim.
90) But it should also have the positive effect of cultivating other feelings and inclinations in us, besides respect for the moral law itself.
For to take this view is to take the view that the explanatory power of moral laws is derivative: it derives from the explanatory power of either the relevant dependence relations themselves or--as seems more likely--the properties or relations that ground those dependence relations.
Yes, on this view moral laws do explain why moral reasons are such reasons.
Hence, on this interpretation, Lance and Little's view would be yet another on which moral laws derive whatever ability they have to do what moral principles do from other things that are--at least in those respects--better suited than they are to be moral principles.
And would it follow either that moral laws are explanatory or that moral principles are moral laws?