moral disgust

moral disgust

A popular term for the nearly universal repugnance people feel toward extremely bad conduct—e.g., child abuse, animal beating, political corruption.
References in periodicals archive ?
2011) reported neuroticism to be not significantly associated with pathogenic, sexual, or moral disgust sensitivities (except for one facet-level relationship), while Tybur and DeVries (2013) reported neuroticism to be associated with heightened pathogenic and sexual disgust sensitivities on the Three-Domain Disgust Scale (Tybur et al.
We hypothesized that moral disgust sensitivity would be associated with lessened BPD total scores as previous research has shown BPD to be associated with behavior such as shoplifting and theft (Selby et al.
What made me laugh most about the moral disgust heaped on Pardew for his heat-of-the moment four-letter reference to Manuel Pellegrini was the playing of the role-model card.
One fMRI study showed that overlapping brain areas are activated whether individuals experience visceral or moral disgust, the implication being that these emotions are related.
Moral judgments are not implicitly tied in to feelings of disgust, since levels of moral disgust can decrease (or increase) as we ponder the issues at stake.
Sections are devoted to research in the areas of personality and aggression (one title: "Slim-bags, Brownnosers and Other Creeps: Moral Disgust as an Interpersonal Avoidance System"), and humor and creativity.
Consistent with previous results, the researchers found that a region of the brain (the anterior insula) previously associated with such negative emotions as moral disgust was activated during unfair treatment.
A fine example of how phenomenology arrives at moral objectivity is Kolnai's derivation of moral disgust from the experience of disgust itself.
But imagine a housewife from, say, Birmingham, subjected to years of intimidation and sexual violence from an abusive partner, and public equivocation replaces clear moral disgust.
Such ambiguities, he suggests, inevitably affect how we respond to Othello, but ambiguous responses are especially characteristic of our reaction to Iago, who is at once a source of intense theatrical pleasure and of strong moral disgust.
The production of disgust -- moral disgust perhaps, but flaring up as a consequence of visceral reactions to defilement or degradation -- has been an important part of the avant garde's armoury.
The University of Toronto study shows a link between moral disgust and more primitive forms of disgust related to poison and disease.