moral disgust

moral disgust

A popular term for the nearly universal repugnance people feel toward extremely bad conduct—e.g., child abuse, animal beating, political corruption.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Dikhead-generated moral indignation spread on social media, with all the prim and proper Cypriots expressing moral disgust at Nik's alleged rudeness towards the saintly Mother Fotini.
2011) reported neuroticism to be not significantly associated with pathogenic, sexual, or moral disgust sensitivities (except for one facet-level relationship), while Tybur and DeVries (2013) reported neuroticism to be associated with heightened pathogenic and sexual disgust sensitivities on the Three-Domain Disgust Scale (Tybur et al.
What made me laugh most about the moral disgust heaped on Pardew for his heat-of-the moment four-letter reference to Manuel Pellegrini was the playing of the role-model card.
For example, sweet taste has been shown to predict prosocial personalities (Meier, Moeller, Riemer-Peltz, & Robinson, 2012), while bitter taste is related to moral disgust and survival motivation (Chapman, Kim, Susskind, & Anderson, 2009; Chen & Chang, 2011; Eskine, Kacinik, & Prinz, 2011).
Lastly, moral disgust functions to motivate avoidance of individuals who inflict social costs at the individual and group level.
Though Cristalis makes clear the role played by Indonesian security forces in driving, and directly participating in, militia violence, she also gives life to members of the Indonesian security apparatus whose motivations are more confused: either out of fear or moral disgust.
One fMRI study showed that overlapping brain areas are activated whether individuals experience visceral or moral disgust, the implication being that these emotions are related.
Sections are devoted to research in the areas of personality and aggression (one title: "Slim-bags, Brownnosers and Other Creeps: Moral Disgust as an Interpersonal Avoidance System"), and humor and creativity.
Steven Anthony Jones as Friar Bonaventura similarly rendered the unique emotions of a man torn between his own personal and moral disgust and his desire to save the souls of the young (albeit aristocratic) sinners.
Consistent with previous results, the researchers found that a region of the brain (the anterior insula) previously associated with such negative emotions as moral disgust was activated during unfair treatment.
A fine example of how phenomenology arrives at moral objectivity is Kolnai's derivation of moral disgust from the experience of disgust itself.
But imagine a housewife from, say, Birmingham, subjected to years of intimidation and sexual violence from an abusive partner, and public equivocation replaces clear moral disgust.