moot

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moot

(mŏŏt),
adj 1. subject to argument, undecided.
adj 2. in law, in a moot case one seeks to determine that an abstract question does not arise on existing facts or rights.
References in periodicals archive ?
Supreme Court, the defendants argued that a direct conflict exists between the 11th and Ninth circuits, holding that claims can be mooted, and the Third and Fifth circuits, holding that certification after a plaintiff's claims are disposed of can vitiate mootness by "relation back" to the complaint.
discussing mootness, the absence of a concrete and ongoing conflict
of the practices settled, militates against a mootness conclusion.
decision on the books that he cannot challenge after mootness terminates
26) Order Regarding Defendants' Motion to Dismiss and Defendants' Motion to Dismiss or for Summary Judgment Based on Mootness, Beleno v.
Notwithstanding the above hornbook tests, however, it should be noted that the Philippine Supreme Court has frequently exercised its institutional discretion to accept various reasons to relax requirements on aspects of justiciability doctrine, such as standing, mootness, and ripeness.
The courts often decline to hear cases, citing threshold issues such as standing, mootness, or the political nature of the questions before them (Adler and George 1996; Fisher 2005; Genovese 1980; Howell 2003; Koh 1990).
To put this another way, the more "passive" judicial virtues of restraint in decision making--deference to the determinations of other public institutions, respect for the limits of the judicial power, and regard for the ability of the private sector to manage its own affairs--seem to be considerably less admired by the media than more "aggressive" judicial understandings that dictate action, that "get things done" (albeit by creative and innovative methods), that repair the flaws and shortcomings of the popular branches, and that do not allow "technicalities" like standing, mootness, ripeness, and "political questions" to stand in the way of achieving pleasant results.
Then, following the introduction, it presents chapters on jurisdiction to review decisions of federal courts and state courts; factors motivating the exercise of the Court's certiorari appellate jurisdiction; the manner in which the court determines to take jurisdiction; procedure in connection with petitions for certiorari; procedure on appeals; in forma pauperis proceedings; certified questions; original cases; extraordinary writs; preparing and printing the joint appendix; the briefs on the merits; oral argument; petitions for rehearing and final disposition of cases; motions and applications; stays, injunctions, and bail; capital cases; justiciability (standing, mootness, and abatement); and admissions to the bar and disbarment.
Determining its truth, falsity, or mootness is no longer the purview of an indeterminate, uncontrollable public arena, but of the present audience.
1) the Court of Civil Appeals misapprehended the "unreasonableness" exception to the Alabama add-back statute; the Court thereby contravened legislative intent, ignored business reality and common business practice, and by constricting that provision to the point of mootness, exposed routine business arrangements to add-back exposure;
Court of Appeal in 2007 was dismissed on the grounds of mootness.