moonlighting


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A popular term for working at a 2nd job after regular working hours—i.e., ‘by moonlight’

moonlighting

Physician income An Americanism, for working at a 2nd job after regular working hrs–ie, 'by moonlight'. See Libby Zion, Medical school debt, 405 Regulations.
References in periodicals archive ?
Technology is changing the way we all behave as consumers, especially in the on-demand world we live in today," said Moonlighting founder and CEO Jeff Tennery.
Moonlighting is strongest for education occupations, where the rate is 12 percent for males and 8 percent for females.
A second reason for examining the cyclicality of multiple-job holding is the potential importance of moonlighting in facilitating labor supply adjustments during temporary economic downturns or upturns.
The first two seasons of Moonlighting focused almost entirely on the two main characters, having them appear in almost every scene.
The expatriate said moonlighting will encroach on his time with his family and friends.
This is followed by an argument for the value of moonlighting in organization studies, a review of the academic literature, and a discussion of possible reasons why multiple jobholding is under-researched.
If you do decide to implement a policy that prohibits moonlighting, you should articulate your business reasons for the rule.
Some start their moonlighting activity as a hobby and later realize they can turn a pastime into lucrative, supplemental income.
The moonlighting rate for men, which had undergone a long-term decline before stabilizing during the 1970's at around 6 percent, continued to hold steady at 5.
Barber has dealt with the issue of moonlighting in detail over the years and again recently in his
Probably, but his employer may not because many still view moonlighting as a sign of disloyalty.