monoxide


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mon·ox·ide

(mon-ok'sīd),
Any oxide with only one atom of oxygen, for example, CO.

monoxide

/mon·ox·ide/ (mon-ok´sīd) an oxide with one oxygen atom in the molecule.

mon·ox·ide

(mon-ok'sīd)
Any oxide having only one atom of oxygen (e.g., CO).

monoxide

(mŏn-ŏk′sīd)
An oxide having only one atom of oxygen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dominic Jenkins, Senior Consultant in Emergency Medicine and Deputy Chair for Clinical Affairs at HMC, warns residents of the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning and the particular danger of burning wood and charcoal indoors.
Private landlords are legally required to fit smoke alarms on each floor of their properties and carbon monoxide alarms in rooms containing solid fuel burners or face a [pounds sterling]5,000 fine.
Chimneys and flues can allow carbon monoxide to invade living spaces without you knowing it.
However, another officer who was not involved in the crash was also admitted to hospital after a high level of carbon monoxide was detected in his body.
Generators, cook tops, clothes dryers, and geysers are some of most common sources of carbon monoxide emission.
A carbon monoxide alarm should be fitted on every floor of your home (ideally in all the bedrooms) and in every room with a fuel-burning appliance or a flue, even if it's concealed.
Stacey, of Deighton, lost 10-year-old son Dominic to carbon monoxide poisoning in 2004 and has campaigned tirelessly since.
There are about 170 deaths in the country every year because of carbon monoxide poisoning from non-automotive products, according to the U.
The Department of Health estimates the true number of people exposed to sub-lethal amounts of carbon monoxide is even greater, however.
Mr Goodfellow and technician Chris Broad delivered a presentation to members of the Brookfield Community Council to raise awareness of the signs and symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning and ways to prevent it.
Their vessel was not fitted with a carbon monoxide alarm, the report adds.
All new solid fuel appliance installations must include a carbon monoxide detector but gas appliances and older stoves and fires do not require one by law.