monoxide


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mon·ox·ide

(mon-ok'sīd),
Any oxide with only one atom of oxygen, for example, CO.

monoxide

/mon·ox·ide/ (mon-ok´sīd) an oxide with one oxygen atom in the molecule.

mon·ox·ide

(mon-ok'sīd)
Any oxide having only one atom of oxygen (e.g., CO).

monoxide

(mŏn-ŏk′sīd)
An oxide having only one atom of oxygen.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bill Stephens, President, ATCO GasThis week, Albertans are asked to check their carbon monoxide alarms.
Carbon monoxide is produced when appliances and consumer products are improperly operating or are not vented properly, including furnaces, boilers, water heaters, ovens, fireplaces, portable heaters, generators and vehicles.
There are about 170 deaths in the country every year because of carbon monoxide poisoning from non-automotive products, according to the U.
Nickel monoxide industry import/export consumption, supply and demand figures and cost price and production value gross margins are also provided.
The carbon monoxide seeped through brickwork underneath Dominic's bedroom and killed him while he was sleeping," she explains.
In Northern Ireland it became law to fit carbon monoxide alarms in all new homes last year and last month, it became part of building regulation for alarms to be fitted in Scotland when installing any gas appliance.
As I know only too well from the experience of my own family, people can have their health devastated by low levels of carbon monoxide without knowing what's causing their debilitating illness for many years.
They also said the ability of carbon monoxide to permeate drywall could explain some instances of carbon monoxide poisoning in attached residences.
Carbon monoxide is produced when fuels such as gas, oil, charcoal, coal and wood do not burn completely.
Lynn Griffiths, founder and president of the charity Carbon Monoxide Awareness, whose own family suffered carbon monoxide poisoning in the home, said: "I want everyone to think about the health and safety of their families, friends and the old person who lives next door or down the street.
Analysis of figures from the Health and Safety Executive shows that in the last five years, the number of incidents of carbon monoxide poisoning has risen by 90 per cent.