monotropy

(redirected from monotrope)
Also found in: Dictionary.

monotropy

[mənot′rəpē]
Etymology: Gk, monos + trepein, to turn
a concept, named by J. Bowlby, describing the phenomenon in which a mother appears to be able to bond with only one infant at a time. The concept is used by Marshall Klaus and John Kennell in their studies of maternal-infant bonding in mothers of twins. When one twin is taken home from the hospital earlier than the other, the mother often reports that she does not feel that the baby discharged later is hers. The second baby to reach the home is much more likely to fail to thrive or to be neglected or abused. Nurses working in intensive care nurseries and adoption homes are also known to become attached to only one child at a time. Monotropy also may explain a mother's common tendency to dress twins alike, in effect making them one. monotropic, adj.