mononuclear

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Related to mononuclear phagocytes: thymus, reticuloendothelial cells

mononuclear

 [mon″o-noo´kle-ar]
having only one nucleus.

mon·o·nu·cle·ar

(mon'ō-nū'klē-ăr),
Having only one nucleus; used especially in reference to phagocytic cells.

mononuclear

/mono·nu·cle·ar/ (-noo´kle-er)
1. having but one nucleus.
2. a cell having a single nucleus, especially a monocyte of the blood or tissues.

mononuclear

(mŏn′ō-no͞o′klē-ər, -nyo͞o′-)
adj.
1. Having only one nucleus: a mononuclear cell.
2. Chemistry Monocyclic.

mononuclear

[-nyo̅o̅′klē·ər]
Etymology: Gk, monos, single; L, nucleus, nut kernel
pertaining to one nucleus, such as a monocyte.

mon·o·nu·cle·ar

(mon'ō-nū'klē-ăr)
Having only one nucleus; used especially in reference to blood cells.

mononuclear

having only one nucleus.

blockade of mononuclear-phagocytic system
results when large numbers of particles or bacteria absorb all available receptor sites or otherwise interfere with phagocytosis. May be a factor in reducing host defense mechanisms.
mononuclear phagocytes
macrophages.
mononuclear phagocyte system
the group of highly phagocytic cells that have a common origin from stem cells of the bone marrow and develop circulating monocytes and tissue macrophages, which develop from monocytes that have migrated to connective tissue of the liver (Kupffer's cells), lung, spleen and lymph nodes. The term has been proposed to replace reticuloendothelial system, which includes some cells of different origin.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mononuclear phagocytes include monocytes in the blood, macrophages that reside in the tissues, and dendritic cells.
JLB publishes articles on original investigations about the origins, developmental biology, biochemistry and functions of granulocytes, lymphocytes, mononuclear phagocytes and other cells involved in host defense.
Sarcoidosis is a multisystem disorder of unknown etiology characterized by the accumulation of T lymphocytes, mononuclear phagocytes, and noncaseating granulomas in involved tissues.
The liver is thought to be the predominant source of AAT in the blood and tissues, with a somewhat lesser contribution from circulating and tissue mononuclear phagocytes.
These receptors play a variety of critical roles including the clearance of immune complexes by mononuclear phagocytes and the mesangial cells in kidney.