monolaurin

monolaurin

Glylorin Dermatology An orphan drug that may be used to manage congenital primary ichthyosis, nonbullous congenital ichthyosiform erythroderma, ichthyosis vulgaris, possibly seborrheic dermatitis. See Ichthyosis vulgaris.
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Recently, results from many studies revealed that monolaurin, the monoglycerides of lauric acid from coconut oil had antimicrobial activity against various gram positive and gram negative organisms, including Escherichia vulneris, Enterobcater spp.
If you'd rather take a supplement, you can buy Monolaurin, a lauric acid supplement, available on the Internet.
Key elements of this "proprietary cosmeceutical blend" include policosanol, derived from sugar cane; coleus oil, a minty ingredient similar to tea tree oil; monolaurin, the popular coconut oil; and vitex oil, a broad-spectrum antimicrobial.
An active component of lauric acid, monolaurin shows promising anti - microbial results
Your body converts lauric acid into monolaurin, which has anti-viral, anti-bacterial and anti-protozoa properties.
Treat yeast, viral, and bacterial infections with natural remedies including: colloidal silver, 714X, monolaurin, D26 Immufense, beta-glucan 1,2,3, Dioxychlor DC3, garlic, Thymic Protein A, and probiotics.
Effects of essential oils and monolaurin on Staphylococcus aureus: in vitro and in vivo studies.
If used in combination with other antimicrobial agents, monolaurin can generate an effective barrier against microorganisms.
Interaction of monolaurin, eugenol and sodium citrate on growth of common meat spoilage and pathogenic organisms.
Washington, Sep 8 (ANI): An extract from coconut oil, called monolaurin, could be used as a microbial agent in foods, according to a study.
In addition, nearly 50% of the fatty acid in natural coconut oil is lauric acid which converts to the fatty acid monolaurin in the body.
And the science on coconut oil, more specifically lauric acid and its byproduct monolaurin, continues to grow.