monogenism

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monogenism

(mə-nŏj′ə-nĭz′əm)
n.
The theory that all humans are descended from the same ancestors. Also called monogeny.

mo·nog′e·nist n.
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References in periodicals archive ?
48) Through this imagery of two trees from same stock, Mill presents the monogenist argument which claims that human beings all originated from the same source/stock, but the racial hierarchies and differences still remain.
Keen to confirm monogenist speculation, based on models of dispersion, that Amerindians had originally migrated from Asia, Morgan extended his inquiries into South India.
Table 2 suggests that all of the monogenist claims concerning human diversity are falsified, in the case of polygeny 2/5 predictions are supported, and finally for evolutionary theory 4/4 are supported with 1 claim not relevant since evolutionary theory makes no specific prediction for the phenomenon.
Hybridity was central to both monogenist and polygenist theories as a criterion defining the boundaries between species of animals and possibly also between races of people: members of the same species were interfertile while those of different species usually were not.
At the egalitarian side of the monogenist spectrum were the staunchest opponents of slavery, one Saint-Simonian, one atheist progressive republican, and one provincial author sympathetic to Christianity.
My aim here is not to open a discussion on the theories of these authors and their differences, such as, for example, the debate between monogenist and polygenist anthropologists or their appropriation of the ideas of Buffon and/or Darwin.
George Mosse (1981) points out this Nazi opposition to the monogenist theory that all races evolved from one source.
To root the new industrial civilization of the 19th century in this alternative history, European intellectuals - a cast of characters ranging from Thomas Carlyle to the Brothers Grimm - now began to reconstruct the histories of different racial types, building on a bewildering variety of shaky monogenist, polygenist, transformist, creationist, vestigialist, environmentalist, and evolutionist authorities.
As a staunch Presbyterian who may have daily read the Bible while in the Comanche camp (Clarke 1969, 20), Burnet's viewpoint was compatible with that of Schoolcraft, himself a pessimistic monogenist and Presbyterian revivalist driven by an interest in the uses of ethnology in missionizing (Beider 1986, 146-193).
Racism and land greed easily outweighed any Christian belief in the monogenist view emphasised in the teachings of St.
Dowie sympathized with the monogenists, who argued that the Genesis creation account of a single human race could be understood literally (Kidd 2006: 128).
But Blumenbach, in the company of many other eighteenth century monogenists, also pointed to the transient and environmentally caused nature of such differences.