monogenesis


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mon·o·gen·e·sis

(mon'ō-jen'ĕ-sis),
1. The production of similar organisms in each generation.
2. The production of young by one parent only, as in nonsexual generation and parthenogenesis.
3. The process of parasitizing a single host, in which the life cycle of the parasite is passed; for example, Boophilus annulatus, the one-host cattle tick, or certain trematodes of the order Monogenea.
[mono- + G. genesis, origin, production]

monogenesis

(mŏn′ə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
Development from a single source, such as a cell, an ancestor, or a language.

mo·nog′e·nous (mə-nŏj′ə-nəs) adj.

mon·o·gen·e·sis

(mon'ō-jen'ĕ-sis)
1. The production of similar organisms in each generation.
2. The production of young by one parent only, as in nonsexual generation and parthenogenesis.
3. The process of parasitizing a single host, in which the entire life cycle of the parasite is passed.
[mono- + G. genesis, origin, production]

monogenesis

(mŏn″ō-jĕn′ĕ-sĭs) [Gr. monos, single, + genesis, generation, birth]
1. Production of offspring of only one sex.
2. The theory that all organisms arise from a single cell.
3. Asexual reproduction.
References in periodicals archive ?
By replacing the "blood" of incest and miscegenation rhetoric with the occult "blood" of the "hidden self," the novel undoes the logic of the genealogical narrative that leads (as Shell puts it) "teleologically" from monogenesis to the universal violation of the incest taboo.
The classic "revisionist" article is Stayer, Packull and Deppermann, "From Monogenesis .
sounds like monogenesis, can already set up an instability within the
The discussion of monogenesis under the subheading THEORIES OF FOLKTALE ORIGIN omits the fact that monogenesis, or the "Aryan myth theory" (Sutherland, 1997, p.
Monogenesis provides a tidy answer; theoretically, all humanity does originate in Africa.
Quarterly Review entitled "From Monogenesis to Polygenesis,"
argue[s] that the principle of monogenesis does not hold across the board in the realm of Semitic texts .
83) The early-modern paradigm, which Kidd has so successfully dissected and discussed, held sway until the emergence of a powerful heterodox religious argument in the late eighteenth century which challenged and ultimately tore asunder any Biblical orthodoxy based upon scriptural monogenesis and a common post-diluvian experience by the inhabitants of the British Isles.
The currents of spiritual reform in early sixteenth-century Spain are so commingled that the search for monogenesis is an invitation to frustration - a frustration reflected in the contentious tone of Nieto's essay.