monogenesis


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mon·o·gen·e·sis

(mon'ō-jen'ĕ-sis),
1. The production of similar organisms in each generation.
2. The production of young by one parent only, as in nonsexual generation and parthenogenesis.
3. The process of parasitizing a single host, in which the life cycle of the parasite is passed; for example, Boophilus annulatus, the one-host cattle tick, or certain trematodes of the order Monogenea.
[mono- + G. genesis, origin, production]

monogenesis

(mŏn′ə-jĕn′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
Development from a single source, such as a cell, an ancestor, or a language.

mo·nog′e·nous (mə-nŏj′ə-nəs) adj.

mon·o·gen·e·sis

(mon'ō-jen'ĕ-sis)
1. The production of similar organisms in each generation.
2. The production of young by one parent only, as in nonsexual generation and parthenogenesis.
3. The process of parasitizing a single host, in which the entire life cycle of the parasite is passed.
[mono- + G. genesis, origin, production]

monogenesis

(mŏn″ō-jĕn′ĕ-sĭs) [Gr. monos, single, + genesis, generation, birth]
1. Production of offspring of only one sex.
2. The theory that all organisms arise from a single cell.
3. Asexual reproduction.
References in periodicals archive ?
By replacing the "blood" of incest and miscegenation rhetoric with the occult "blood" of the "hidden self," the novel undoes the logic of the genealogical narrative that leads (as Shell puts it) "teleologically" from monogenesis to the universal violation of the incest taboo.
Kidd's point is a good one, well made: the "Protestant" enlightenment was far more conservative than the French one, which, in terms of biblical scholarship, meant more prone to defend monogenesis and the essential racial unity of mankind.
The ethnologists launched a full-scale critique on the established ethnological theory of monogenesis.
The classic "revisionist" article is Stayer, Packull and Deppermann, "From Monogenesis .
sounds like monogenesis, can already set up an instability within the
Using Michel Foucault and Elaine Scarry, among others, as theoretical frames, the introduction most importantly discusses the emerging scientific theory of polygenesis, which replaced the earlier theory of monogenesis by assuming innate differences between races (and genders) rather than posing a common origin for different races.
2000, Monogenesis and Polygenesis in Comparative Semitics and Arabic.
Even though the idea of Adam as our common ancestor, monogenesis (mono=sole; genesis=development) is rejected, it is nevertheless maintained that mankind, together with all other animals, share a common ancestor.
I feel "the hand that caresses the thigh is the instrument of/ possibility philosophy monogenesis the basic theory/an absolute comfort factor.
Guaman Poma makes this point in order to debunk the racial differentiations prevalent in Spanish historiography about the conquest, instead asserting the anthropological unity of mankind in monogenesis.
The Evangelical Christians believed, implicitly at least, in the monogenesis of the human race and the ultimate human equality formulated in traditional Christian theology.
For the definitive account of this shift, see James Stayer, Werner Packull, and Klaus Deppermann, "From Monogenesis to Polygenesis: The Historical Discussion of Anabaptist Origins," The Mennonite Quarterly Review 49 (April 1975): 83-121.