monoculture

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monoculture

an agricultural system in which a single crop (e.g. wheat) is grown to the exclusion of other crops.
References in periodicals archive ?
All these things attract and maintain tourism in an age of otherwise stultifying monoculturalism - it is the things that make us so different that is so attractive to people," the Daily Mail quoted Charles as saying.
In other words, the multivoiced body is submerged under the monoculturalism against which Sen warns us.
66) The 1960s thus began a confrontation between Hasluck's liberalism and an ethical orientation which conceived assimilationist monoculturalism, given its construction of 'welfare' as concerned to transcend/eliminate cultural difference, as inherently 'despotic' (Valverde 1996), to the point of at least verging on the political, if not legal, conception of 'genocide'.
Bryan Fanning argues that the failure of the government to deal with refugees in the nineteen fifties was not simply the result of incompetence, but also 'reflected an institutional monoculturalism which identified difference as a threat.
As critics see it, however, Canadian multiculturalism should more accurately be described as serial monoculturalism, since there is relatively little crossover or contact among the various cultural communities.
Ethnicity, or monoculturalism, is after all not the only way to imagine a nation.
Between monoculturalism and multiculturalism: Traps awaiting the organization.
In contrast to earlier models of culture learning, learners are no longer expected to reject their own culture and "take on" the target culture (something viewed as undesirable as it involves replacing one form of monoculturalism for another), but rather to find what Kramsch (1993) describes as a "third place.
2) Critiques of monoculturalism and ethnocentrism now permeate texts on multiculturalism.
Likewise, for many international students front East and South-east Asia the complacent monoculturalism of business and information technology courses is less of a drawback than it might seem.
It was simply the lack of available knowledge of Aboriginal `culture, tradition and history' during the 1950s when Hasluck was Minister for Territories and still in the mid-1980s when he wrote his valedictory work on Aboriginal policy, Shades of Darkness, that determined the monoculturalism of Hasluck's vision, argues Henderson.
This monoculturalism flows in part from the staff make up, the result not just of incumbency, but from a far-from-transparent recruitment process that continues to favour Anglo-Australians and British immigrants.