monkshood


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Related to monkshood: Aconitum, foxglove

ac·o·nite

(ak'ō-nīt),
The dried root of Aconitum napellus (family Ranunculaceae), commonly known as monkshood or wolfsbane; a powerful and rapid-acting poison formerly used as an antipyretic, diuretic, diaphoretic, anodyne, cardiac and respiratory depressant, and externally as an analgesic.

aconite

Herbal medicine
An alkaloid derived from the plant by the same name, which formerly had currency as a medicinal herb; given aconite’s toxicity, it is no longer used in herbal medicine.

Toxicity
Abdominal pain, anxiety, blurred vision, bradycardia, burning sensation, cardiac arrhythmias, chest pain, diaphoresis, dyspnoea, impaired speech, muscular weakness, nausea, paresthesias, vertigo, vomiting, and possibly death due to respiratory failure or ventricular fibrillation.

Management
Gastric lavage, atropine, digitalis.
 
Homeopathy
A homeopathic remedy for treating swelling, fever, infections, restlessness, anxiety and panic attacks, and parasthesias; it has also been used for anginal pain, arrhythmias, arthritis, asthma, bronchitis, respiratory infections, laryngitis, sore throat, toothaches. In homeopathy, aconite’s concentration is extremely low, thus reducing its potential toxicity.

ac·o·nite

(ak'ŏ-nīt)
The dried root of Aconitum napellus (family Ranunculaceae), commonly known as wolfsbane; a powerful and rapid-acting poison formerly used as an antipyretic, diuretic, diaphoretic, anodyne, cardiac and respiratory depressant, and externally as an analgesic.
Synonym(s): fu tzu, monkshood.
[L. aconitum, fr. G. akoniton]

monkshood

References in periodicals archive ?
Sims, Monkshood and Guy Thorne contributed one or more items each (when the last-mentioned died early in 1923, it was Greening who led the appeal for a subscription for the impoverished widow) (47).
Refuge expansion would provide more protection for the Northern monkshood and other glacial relict snails as well.
Lethal: Nightshade (main picture) and monkshood (above) are both killers Gates of hell: The Duchess in the Poison Garden at Alnwick
Hold together monkshood, rosemary and thistle head and secure with string.
Look for explorer's gentian, sidalcea, mariposa lily (Calochortus leichilinii), alpine lily, delphinium, meadow-rue, peony, monkshood, columbine, spiraea, thimbleberry, penstemons, violets, monkeyflower (Mimulus torreyi), paintbrush, fireweed, and, in the orchid family, spotted coralroot.
PLANT | of the week: MONKSHOOD IF you like delphiniums, you might like this plant.
Aconite, also known as monkshood, is on a UK list of restricted herbal ingredients.
KILLERS - Above, Deadly Nightshade and below, Monkshood EXPERT - The Duchess of Northumberland in the Poison Garden at Alnwick
These all make very good cut flowers but, beware; rather like a close relative, the monkshood, aconitum, the seeds are poisonous.
Susan Victoria Hughes, 25, of Monkshood Retreat, Kings Norton, possessing diamorphine, fined pounds 85, pounds 15 victim surcharge, costs pounds 70.
He asks: "What's the difference, Potter, between monkshood and wolfsbane?
The volunteers planted herbs including lavender, angelica, myrtle and monkshood.