monistic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mo·nis·tic

(mŏ-nis'tik),
Pertaining to monism.

monistic

Biology
adjective Single; whole.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
20] For Herder, man can only experience happiness when he understands himself to exist within a unified, monistic whole, a cultural constellatio n of norms, practices, and beliefs in which he can find meaning and purpose.
At that point a decision-maker will be forced to give priority to either the spiritual or the temporal perspective, and we will once again be faced with the same problems that afflict the monistic positions.
Second, if we do take the monistic model seriously, what are the implications for these assumptions on how we today understand Judaism?
I imagine that if this implication does not strike us as strange, it is only because we at some level accept the unstated supposition that "the law" is indeed a coherent, monistic, non-contradictory whole.
It is inappropriate to adopt a monistic stance by adopting a single type and considering no other.
Using Kuhn's well-known model as an illustration, this paper shows how a monistic conception of the development of science is too restrictive to help understand the present state of MIS.
Once again, the impact of Joachite patterns is a good starting point, as we observe the mixture of gradual transformations and violent revolutions which led from the Christian substratum towards all-encompassing philosophies of history and monistic ideologies.
In their rendering Hinduism got straight jacketed into monotheistic, monistic one and this puritan monolithic notion of Hinduism came to be presented as Hinduism.
Their program is in the general tradition of metaphysical monistic systems that are based on alleged implications of quantum mechanics, although it is broader in scope.
At stake--here Israel, who has argued in the guise of a philosopher like Descartes and a moralist like Kant, now turns into a metahistorian like Hegel--was "the wider battle between radical and moderate thought, between the visions of a time-honored, God-ordained, providential order, on the one hand, and monistic, Spinozistic systems anchored in representative democracy and egalitarianism, on the other.
Alexander Bird defends a monistic dispositional essentialism by which all fundamental natural properties have essences that are dispositional.
He finds a more monistic view in the laws and stories from the Yerushalmi than is demonstrated in their parallels in the Bavli.