monism

(redirected from monist)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

mo·nism

(mō'nizm),
A metaphysical system in which all of reality is conceived as a unified whole.
[G. monos, single]

mo·nism

(mō'nizm)
A metaphysical system in which all of reality is conceived as a unified whole.
[G. monos, single]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
No scholar has seen more clearly than Paul Kahn that the effect of this profoundly monist view of the state is to make it a sacred place.
78) Public international law consists of concepts of monist and dualist legal systems in countries.
Cottier insists that we have long moved beyond a simple dichotomy between monist and dualist models of international law towards what he terms "an emerging doctrine of multilayered governance".
In practice, most of the countries that are member state to the monist theory are civil law countries and that is why there established a constitutional court.
The reasons why it does matter, however, and why the monist scientist should not be careless in the usage of ontological terms, lie in the reinforcement history and context of the listener.
Also see "The Varieties of Intrinsic Value," The Monist 75 (1992) 119-37 in which John O'Neill explores three interchangeable ways in which "intrinsic value" is used.
He championed a "radical empiricism" (radical because it challenged typical empiricist assumptions) which was always open to modification, but also resistant to monist conceptualization.
The monist view is that international and domestic law are part of the same legal order, international law is automatically incorporated into each nation's legal system, and international law is supreme over domestic law.
In Mexico's monist system, one could hardly limit the interactions between treaties and domestic laws to instances of normative conflict.
Brandom, Robert, 1983, "Heideggers Categories in Being and Time", The Monist 66, 1983, pp.
5) See Hugo Bedau, "The Right to Life," The Monist 52 (1968): 550-572 for a discussion of the natural rights thinkers on self-defense.
This is the central question: whether economics today is monist in its hard core (axiological) or holist (management, for instance, includes a variety of values).