molecular movement


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movement

 [mo̳v´ment]
1. an act of moving; called also motion.
2. an act of defecation.
active movement movement produced by the person's own muscles.
ameboid movement movement like that of an ameba, accomplished by protrusion of cytoplasm of the cell.
associated movement movement of parts that act together, as the eyes.
brownian movement the peculiar, rapid, oscillatory movement of fine particles suspended in a fluid medium; called also molecular movement.
circus movement the propagation of an impulse again and again through tissue already previously activated by it; the term is usually reserved for the reentry involving an accessory pathway.
molecular movement brownian movement.
passive movement a movement of the body or of the extremities of a patient performed by another person without voluntary motion on the part of the patient.
vermicular m's the wormlike movements of the intestines in peristalsis.

brown·i·an move·ment

erratic, nondirectional, zigzag movement observed by ultramicroscope in certain colloidal solutions and by microscope in suspensions of light particulate matter that results from the jostling or bumping of the larger particles by the molecules in the suspending medium which are regarded as being in continuous motion.
[Robert Brown]

brown·i·an move·ment

(brown'ē-ăn mūv'mĕnt)
Erratic, nondirectional, zigzag movement observed by microscope in suspensions of particles in fluid, resulting from the jostling or bumping of the larger particles by the molecules in the suspending medium.
Synonym(s): molecular movement, pedesis.
[Robert Brown]

Brown,

Robert, English botanist, 1773-1858.
brownian motion - Synonym(s): brownian movement
brownian movement - rapid random motion of small particles in suspension. Synonym(s): brownian motion; brownian-Zsigmondy movement; molecular movement; pedesis
brownian-Zsigmondy movement - Synonym(s): brownian movement

movement

an act of moving; motion.

movement abnormality
includes involuntary movement, lack of flexion or rigidity, hyper- or hypometric.
active movement
movement produced by the animal's own muscles.
ameboid movement
movement like that of an ameba, accomplished by protrusion of cytoplasm of the cell.
associated movement
movement of parts that act together, such as the eyes.
brownian movement
continuous movement of particles suspended within a liquid.
conjugate movement
two parts moving synchronously in the same direction, e.g. the eyes.
disjunctive movement
two parts moving synchronously but in opposite directions.
involuntary movement
a movement which the animal is unable to prevent.
molecular movement
the peculiar, rapid, oscillatory movement of fine particles suspended in a fluid medium.
passive movement
a movement of the body or of the extremities of an animal performed by a person without voluntary motion on the part of the animal.
purposeful movement
see voluntary movement (below).
vermicular m's
the wormlike movements of the intestines in peristalsis.
voluntary movement
performed out of the will of the animal; an intentional purposeful movement.
References in periodicals archive ?
This behavior is also due to the increased intermolecular interaction effect, since the intermolecular interactions resulted in a decrease of free volume and hindered molecular movements.
By comparing the actual diffraction patterns to those predicted by computer models, the team could track the order and timing of the ultra-fast molecular movements involved in the phase change.
It's hard to see how the molecular movements (called Brownian motion) produced by such violence could accomplish anything useful.

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