molecular

(redirected from molecular activity)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

molecular

 [mo-lek´u-ler]
of, pertaining to, or composed of molecules.
molecular disease any disease in which the pathogenesis can be traced to a single chemical substance, usually a protein, which is either abnormal in structure or present in reduced amounts.

mo·lec·u·lar

(mō-lek'yū-lăr),
Relating to molecules.

molecular

(mə-lĕk′yə-lər)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or consisting of molecules.
2. Of or relating to simple or basic structure or form.

mo·lec′u·lar′i·ty (-lăr′ĭ-tē) n.
mo·lec′u·lar·ly adv.

mo·lec·u·lar

(mō-lek'yū-lăr)
Relating to molecules.

molecular

of, pertaining to, or composed of molecules.

molecular activity
see enzyme activity.
molecular biology
study of the biochemical and biophysical aspects of the structure and function of genes and other subcellular entities, and of such specific proteins as hemoglobins, enzymes and hormones; it provides knowledge of cellular differentiation and metabolism and of comparative evolution.
molecular layer
layers of cells in both cerebellar and cerebral cortices.
molecular mimicry
see antigenic mimicry.
molecular weight
see molecular weight.
References in periodicals archive ?
Such molecular activity is "a fundamental basis in life," says Kondo.
Image fusion technology combines images from CT, PET and MRI scans into a 3-D image that give doctors a better look at the size, location and molecular activity of a tumor, all of which is important for more accurate diagnosis and better designed treatment plans.
The hybrid SPECT-CT systems feature advanced SPECT technology that detects changes in patients' molecular activity - before structural changes become visible - and combine this information with precise anatomical detail obtained through six-slice CT technology to pinpoint the location of abnormal tissue.
The platform will further provide molecular activity information supporting the use of MIICRO's human neuroimaging technology as a biomarker for therapeutic effect.
With a single scanning session, this imaging technology quickly captures comprehensive, accurate information on both the molecular and anatomical levels, enabling clinicians to detect changes in molecular activity even before structural changes become visible.
ACADIA's data indicates that the desired molecular activity is actually inverse agonism of this receptor, rather than neutral antagonism.
Traditional technology only permits the study of average molecular activity.
Anderson Cancer Center to detect changes in molecular activity even before structural changes become visible.

Full browser ?