modernisation

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modernisation

A process in which a society moves away from traditional views towards rational/secular views, and away from a subtext of survival and security towards one of self-expression.
References in classic literature ?
But if some intelligent and accomplished friend points out to him, that the difficulties by which he is startled are more in appearance than reality, if, by reading aloud to him, or by reducing the ordinary words to the modern orthography, he satisfies his proselyte that only about one-tenth part of the words employed are in fact obsolete, the novice may be easily persuaded to approach the ``well of English undefiled,'' with the certainty that a slender degree of patience will enable him to enjoy both the humour and the pathos with which old Geoffrey delighted the age of Cressy and of Poictiers.
Modern bourgeois society with its relations of production, of exchange and of property, a society that has conjured up such gigantic means of production and of exchange, is like the sorcerer, who is no longer able to control the powers of the nether world whom he has called up by his spells.
The strangeness and absurdity of these replies arise from the fact that modern history, like a deaf man, answers questions no one has asked.
and only the intellectual poet, as we have pointed out, can be adequate to modern demands) will have his difficulties.
And so it was that I, the modern, often entered into my dreaming, and in the consequent strange dual personality was both actor and spectator.
Nobody beneath the nobleman, or the gentleman of ancient lineage, so much as thought of buying a modern picture.
Modern philosophy says that all things in nature are dependent on one another; the ancient philosopher had the same truth latent in his mind when he affirmed that out of one thing all the rest may be recovered.
The ranks of the visitors parted before the last speaker, and disclosed to view, in the midst of that modern assembly, a gentleman of the bygone time.
As a direct consequence the resulting language, modern English, is the richest and most varied instrument of expression ever developed at any time by any race.
Because, in the first place, if the principle of election is to be the basis of a system, absolute equality among the electors is a first requirement; they ought to be 'equal quantities,' things which modern politics will never bring about.
The symbol of an ancient man's thought becomes a modern man's speech.
And many of the latest conceptions of modern thinkers and statesmen, such as the unity of knowledge, the reign of law, and the equality of the sexes, have been anticipated in a dream by him.