mitigation

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mitigate

(mit′ĭ-gāt″) [L. mitigare, to soften]
To reduce the intensity of an effect; alleviate.
mitigated (-gāt″ĕd), adjectivemitigation (mit″ĭ-gā′shŏn)

mitigation (mit´igā´shən),

n alleviation; abatement or diminution of a penalty imposed by law.
mitigation of damages,
n a reduction of damages based on facts showing that the plaintiff's course of action does not entitle the plaintiff to as large an amount as the evidence would otherwise justify the jury in allowing.

Patient discussion about mitigation

Q. I have had ankylosing spondilitis for over 25 years. What is available at this point to mitigate the effects?

A. The mainstay of the treatment severe ankylosing spondylitis today are "anti-TNF", drugs that affect the immune system through blocking the action of a protein called TNF.

Other optional treatments include sulfasalazine and thalidomide.
Of course, all these treatments require prescription and consultation with a doctor (in this case usually rheumatologist).

You may read more here: http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ankylosingspondylitis.html

More discussions about mitigation
References in periodicals archive ?
An example of enforcement monitoring is a penalty clause written into a contract for the performance of mitigation measures.
Effectiveness monitoring is a more challenging concept than enforcement monitoring in that it actually measures the effectiveness of particular mitigation measures over time.
In addition to the requirements of the Army NEPA regulation, some recent court decisions provide further incentive to ensure that mitigation is well thought out and executed by federal agencies.
In a case decided in 2001, the Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit stated that "[w]hile the Agency is not required to develop a complete mitigation plan detailing `the precise nature of the mitigation measures,' the proposed mitigation measures must be `developed to a reasonable degree.
The CEQ regulations, the Army NEPA regulation, and recent case law all suggest that federal agencies closely analyze and plan for mitigation issues in preparing analyses under NEPA.