mistletoe

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vis·cum

(vis'kŭm),
1. The berries of Viscum album (family Loranthaceae), a parasitic plant growing on apple, pear, and other trees; has been used as an oxytocic. Synonym(s): mistletoe
2. Herbage of Phoradendron flavescens, American mistletoe; has been used as an oxytocic and emmenagoque.

mistletoe

/mis·tle·toe/ (mis´il-to) any of several related parasitic shrubs. European m. (Viscum album) contains small amounts of several toxins and is used for rheumatism and as an adjunct in cancer therapy; also used in traditional Chinese medicine and homeopathy.

mistletoe

(mĭs′əl-tō′)
n.
1. Any of various semiparasitic plants of the order Santalales that grow on the branches of other plants, especially Viscum album of Eurasia and Phoradendron leucarpum of North America, both of which have leathery evergreen leaves and waxy white berries. Extracts of the Eurasian species are sometimes used for medicinal purposes.
2. A sprig of mistletoe, often used as a Christmas decoration.

mistletoe

(1) American mistletoe, see there; Phoradendron jlavescens.  
(2) European mistletoe (Viscum alhum), a parasitic evergreen plant that has been used for hypertension and cancer.
 
Toxicity
Mistletoe is poisonous; the FDA lists it as unsafe and does not approve its use.

mistletoe,

n Latin names:
Viscum album, Viscum abietis, Viscum austriacum; parts used: branches, fruits, leaves; uses: anxiolytic, high blood pressure, seizure disorders, immu-nomodulator, depression, gout, insomnia, cancer; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children, protein hypersensitivity, antihypertensive medications, cardiac glycosides, depressants, immunosuppressant medications, HIV, toxic plant. Also called
all heal, birdlime, devil's fuge, European mistletoe, golden bough, or
mystyldene.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mistletoe is a very interesting plant and I know it is difficult to find.
Many insects (Lepidoptera, Hemiptera, Coleoptera, Orthoptera, and Thysanoptera) have been reported to feed exclusively on dwarf mistletoes (Stevens and Hawksworth, 1970, 1984; Hawksworth and Wiens, 1996).
Trees with large crowns may be more likely to be infested by mistletoes as they provide more landing spaces for birds, from where mistletoe seeds may be excreted (Thompson and Noe, Jr.
Conclusions: The data presented show that distinction between mistletoes from different host trees harvested during summer or winter is feasible by determination of their specific monosaccharide and sugar alcohol pattern and concentration levels, respectively.
The new species of tropical, wild mistletoe was found by a butterfly specialist, Colin Congdon, who was on an expedition of the United Kingdom's Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, which is the New York Yankees (the old Yankees, mind you) of plant and fungi species researchers.
Mistletoe is a semi-obligate parasite plant that lives on many different kinds of trees including oak trees.
Most species of African mistletoes belong to the genera Agelanthus and Phragmanthera, the former being the largest genus in Africa with 59 species while the latter with 34 species is known to be a common pest of plantation crops (Polhill and Wiens 1998).
The mistletoe from across the Atlantic is widely regarded as so flimsy and unworthy it invariably disintegrates before you even manage to find the object of your affection.
There are about 70 species of mistletoe growing wild across the world's temperate zones but only one that matters at Christmas time in Britain ( Viscum album, with wishbone-shaped pairs of leaves and pairs of white berries that can be toxic to humans.
The general view has been that mistletoes are almost always parasites.
The first type is readily identifiable during this time of year since its host trees - all deciduous - have lost a great many of their leaves by now, slowly revealing the evergreen parasitic mistletoes that had been obscured by their hosts' foliage.