mistletoe


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vis·cum

(vis'kŭm),
1. The berries of Viscum album (family Loranthaceae), a parasitic plant growing on apple, pear, and other trees; has been used as an oxytocic. Synonym(s): mistletoe
2. Herbage of Phoradendron flavescens, American mistletoe; has been used as an oxytocic and emmenagoque.

mistletoe

/mis·tle·toe/ (mis´il-to) any of several related parasitic shrubs. European m. (Viscum album) contains small amounts of several toxins and is used for rheumatism and as an adjunct in cancer therapy; also used in traditional Chinese medicine and homeopathy.

mistletoe

(mĭs′əl-tō′)
n.
1. Any of various semiparasitic plants of the order Santalales that grow on the branches of other plants, especially Viscum album of Eurasia and Phoradendron leucarpum of North America, both of which have leathery evergreen leaves and waxy white berries. Extracts of the Eurasian species are sometimes used for medicinal purposes.
2. A sprig of mistletoe, often used as a Christmas decoration.

mistletoe

(1) American mistletoe, see there; Phoradendron jlavescens.  
(2) European mistletoe (Viscum alhum), a parasitic evergreen plant that has been used for hypertension and cancer.
 
Toxicity
Mistletoe is poisonous; the FDA lists it as unsafe and does not approve its use.

mistletoe,

n Latin names:
Viscum album, Viscum abietis, Viscum austriacum; parts used: branches, fruits, leaves; uses: anxiolytic, high blood pressure, seizure disorders, immu-nomodulator, depression, gout, insomnia, cancer; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children, protein hypersensitivity, antihypertensive medications, cardiac glycosides, depressants, immunosuppressant medications, HIV, toxic plant. Also called
all heal, birdlime, devil's fuge, European mistletoe, golden bough, or
mystyldene.
References in periodicals archive ?
Folklorists speculate that this led to the tradition of smooching under the mistletoe.
The experts in the edition of the journal, African Health Science had compared the effects of mistletoe harvested from three different plants (Coffee, kola, and cocoa) on blood samples of albino rats.
It is widely accepted that the tradition of kissing under the mistletoe began in the 16th century, but the history of the plant goes back much farther than that.
By the 18th century, it had become widely incorporated into Christmas traditions and men were allowed to "steal a kiss" from any woman caught standing under the mistletoe.
As mistletoe is a parasitic plant, which means it depends on a host plant to survive, it can be quite difficult to propagate yourself.
Mistletoe is a parasite that attaches itself to other trees.
Irish wholesalers were among hundreds of bidders at Tenbury Mistletoe Festival in Worcestershire on Tuesday.
It is believed mistletoe auctions were a common sight in the area from the mid-19th century and when it came under threat of closure in 2004, when the site came up for sale, local people fought to keep the tradition alive.
Centuries ago, mistletoe was thought to possess magical and healing powers.
It deals with mistletoe and its history and why it isn't widely available even though it is such a popular part of Christmas.