mistletoe


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vis·cum

(vis'kŭm),
1. The berries of Viscum album (family Loranthaceae), a parasitic plant growing on apple, pear, and other trees; has been used as an oxytocic. Synonym(s): mistletoe
2. Herbage of Phoradendron flavescens, American mistletoe; has been used as an oxytocic and emmenagoque.

mistletoe

/mis·tle·toe/ (mis´il-to) any of several related parasitic shrubs. European m. (Viscum album) contains small amounts of several toxins and is used for rheumatism and as an adjunct in cancer therapy; also used in traditional Chinese medicine and homeopathy.

mistletoe

(mĭs′əl-tō′)
n.
1. Any of various semiparasitic plants of the order Santalales that grow on the branches of other plants, especially Viscum album of Eurasia and Phoradendron leucarpum of North America, both of which have leathery evergreen leaves and waxy white berries. Extracts of the Eurasian species are sometimes used for medicinal purposes.
2. A sprig of mistletoe, often used as a Christmas decoration.

mistletoe

(1) American mistletoe, see there; Phoradendron jlavescens.  
(2) European mistletoe (Viscum alhum), a parasitic evergreen plant that has been used for hypertension and cancer.
 
Toxicity
Mistletoe is poisonous; the FDA lists it as unsafe and does not approve its use.

mistletoe,

n Latin names:
Viscum album, Viscum abietis, Viscum austriacum; parts used: branches, fruits, leaves; uses: anxiolytic, high blood pressure, seizure disorders, immu-nomodulator, depression, gout, insomnia, cancer; precautions: pregnancy, lactation, children, protein hypersensitivity, antihypertensive medications, cardiac glycosides, depressants, immunosuppressant medications, HIV, toxic plant. Also called
all heal, birdlime, devil's fuge, European mistletoe, golden bough, or
mystyldene.
References in periodicals archive ?
Irish wholesalers were among hundreds of bidders at Tenbury Mistletoe Festival in Worcestershire on Tuesday.
Eliminating the need climb a ladder to mount a sprig of mistletoe over a door opening or to wait for the object of your affection to walk beneath it, this easy-to-fly quadcopter puts a modern spin on a centuries old holiday tradition.
It is believed mistletoe auctions were a common sight in the area from the mid-19th century and when it came under threat of closure in 2004, when the site came up for sale, local people fought to keep the tradition alive.
Ruth Tilly, 29, among the holly during the Tenbury Mistletoe And Holly <B Auction at Burford House Garden Store in Tenbury Wells, Worcestershire
Mistletoe is a very interesting plant and I know it is difficult to find.
This relationship is based on the ability of dwarf mistletoe to reduce the defenses of its host, leaving the tree predisposed to injury and mortality by a myriad of secondary pests, including bark beetles (Stevens and Hawksworth, 1970, 1984; Parker et al.
The objectives of this study were to (i) determine the effect of tree size on mistletoe infestation severity (number of mistletoe clusters per tree) and (ii) assess the spatial distribution of mistletoe-infested trees in an urban environment.
DON'T believe the Christmas scare stories - there's no need for mistletoe and whine.
The popularity of mistletoe as a decoration goes back to early pagan times when evergreens like mistletoe that didn't lose leaves were seen as somehow magical.
EVERYBODY hopes for a kiss from a certain someone under the mistletoe - and this week I am sharing another family tradition with you.
Washington, December 1 ( ANI ): Mistletoe, which has become an important symbol of Christmas, also has the potential to play a vital role as an alternative therapy for sufferers of colon cancer, researchers say.