mistake

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mistake

Medspeak
An act, omission or error in judgement by a healthcare provider that has or may have serious consequences for a patient and would be judged to be wrong by knowledgeable peers. 

Vox populi
An incorrect act, decision or statement that is knowledge-based, judgemental, heuristic or based on subconscious bias.

mistake

Decision-making
1. An act, omission or error in judgement by a health care provider that has/may have serious consequences for a Pt and that would be judged to be wrong by knowledgeable peers.
2. An incorrect act, decision, or statement that is knowledge-based, judgemental, heuristic, or based on subconscious bias. See Medical mistake. Cf Misdiagnosis, 'Overcall. ', 'Undercall'.

mistake,

n an unintentional act, omission, or error resulting from ignorance, surprise, or misplaced confidence.

Patient discussion about mistake

Q. My husband takes Zocor (20mg) for his hyperlipidemia. by mistake he took 3 pills (60mg). What to do? My husband suffers from high blood lipids and he is treated with Zocor (Simvastatin). he should take one pill of 20 mg per day. By accident he took 3 pills (60mg) in one day. what to do?

A. You need to call your GP. Zocor doses are between 20-80 mg but maybe your husband has other problems (mainly in his kidneys) that will interfere with the normal way of cleaning the body from the drug.
Zocor overdose symptoms will be myalgia and red urine (in a severe overdose) if your husband have one of those symptoms go to the ER as soon as possible.

More discussions about mistake
References in classic literature ?
At first she thought it was the old-time mistake she had made in asking for a holiday to get married.
Here, again, Magdalen's inexperience betrayed itself -- and here once more her resolution in attacking and conquering her own mistakes astonished everybody.
There was a character about Madame Defarge, from which one might have predicated that she did not often make mistakes against herself in any of the reckonings over which she presided.
Nor was it that the figs were moist and pulpy, or that the French plums blushed in modest tartness from their highly-decorated boxes, or that everything was good to eat and in its Christmas dress; but the customers were all so hurried and so eager in the hopeful promise of the day, that they tumbled up against each other at the door, crashing their wicker baskets wildly, and left their purchases upon the counter, and came running back to fetch them, and committed hundreds of the like mistakes, in the best humour possible; while the Grocer and his people were so frank and fresh that the polished hearts with which they fastened their aprons behind might have been their own, worn outside for general inspection, and for Christmas daws to peck at if they chose.
There must be no mistakes in life with THIS Betsey Trotwood.
The administration of mutton instead of medicine, the substitution of Tea for Joe, and the baker for bacon, were among the mildest of my own mistakes.
But they thought the want of moral virtues was so far from being supplied by superior endowments of the mind, that employments could never be put into such dangerous hands as those of persons so qualified; and, at least, that the mistakes committed by ignorance, in a virtuous disposition, would never be of such fatal consequence to the public weal, as the practices of a man, whose inclinations led him to be corrupt, and who had great abilities to manage, to multiply, and defend his corruptions.
Nowadays most people die of a sort of creeping common sense, and discover when it is too late that the only things one never regrets are one's mistakes.
It assembled the most complete assortment of other nations' mistakes, and invented several of its own.
They had no pride of vain philosophy to support, no perfidious rage of faction to glut, by persevering in their mistakes until they should be extinguished in torrents of blood.
A concise review of the events that have attended confederate governments will further illustrate this important doctrine; an inattention to which has been the great source of our political mistakes, and has given our jealousy a direction to the wrong side.
At home they might hear political and ecclesiastical secrets intended not for them but for their husbands and brothers, and might even issue commands in the name of a priestly Circle; out of doors the striking combination of red and green, without addition of any other colours, would be sure to lead the common people into endless mistakes, and the Women would gain whatever the Circles lost, in the deference of the passers by.