felony

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felony

[fel′ənē]
(in criminal law) a crime declared by statute to be more serious than a misdemeanor and deserving of a more severe penalty. Conviction usually requires imprisonment in a penitentiary for longer than 1 year. Crimes of murder, rape, burglary, and arson are tried as felonies in most cases. In many states there is current, pending, or new legislation that essentially bars applicants from taking the nursing licensure exam NCLEX-RN or PN if certain felonies exist in their history. Criminal background checks, state and federal, are required of all graduate nurses and, in some states, of nursing students before clinical rotations.

felony

A more serious crime than a misdemeanor with punishment greater than that for misdemeanors; can be grounds for license denial, revocation, suspension, or probation of a health care provider. It is punishable by imprisonment or death, depending on state law and the type of crime.

felony,

n a crime declared by statute to be more serious than a misdemeanor and deserving of a more severe penalty. Conviction usually requires imprisonment in a penitentiary for longer than 1 year.
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the doctrine of misprision of felony is firmly established
Of sixteen grand jurors, seven voted to indict Wilkinson for misprision of treason (Wheelan 2005, 168).
if the federal prosecutor had offered a plea to misprision or accessory
The Abbot of Cluny, in Filostrato's tale, had pithily expressed this awareness, moving from the unsettled seeming of Primasso to assessing his full appearance, and his own misprision.
THROUGH INCOMPETENCE, misprision, and disingenuousness, the Obama administration has created the potential for diplomatic catastrophe--the collapse of the southern referenda and the Comprehensive Peace Agreement.
Angela pled guilty a few days later to one count of misprision of a felony.
The adapter as lover metaphor works well, especially if you expand the love to include Oedipal misprision (Harold Bloom's famous term for misreading) of Mommy or Daddy Dearest, the powerful source text the adapter both loves and loathes.
Spenser's Ireland" incorporates this idiosyncratic style of delivery in a number of ways, but the most prominent and productive is the use of the Irish bull, a mode of misprision in which the speaker's "solecisms supposedly go unnoticed by the speakers" but are heard and assessed by the auditor.
I call it gloss or variation for the sake of greater accuracy; translation is a mirage, if not misprision.
It is a book about teaching, and so the howlers serve a useful (even if unintended) purpose, for they are a humbling reminder of how misprision can occur even between the very best of teachers and most intelligent of auditors.
As to medieval Latin, there is a consistent misprision, as exemplified in the unfortunately influential writings of John Stevens and others, that "rhythmic" was a matter of the number of syllables in the line.
A writer's "creative correction" of another's work points toward the necessary coexistence of creativity with willful misprision and "agon," or a "contest for aesthetic supremacy" (Bloom xxiv); writers are often most affected by the very peers they seek to eclipse.