misogyny

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Related to misogynic: chauvinistic, dubious

misogyny

 [mĭ-soj´ĭ-ne]
aversion to women.

mi·sog·y·ny

(mi-soj'i-nē), Do not confuse this word with misogamy.
Aversion to or hatred of women.
[G. miseō, to hate, + gynē, woman]

misogyny

/mi·sog·y·ny/ (mĭ-soj´ĭ-ne) hatred of women.

misogyny

(mĭ-sŏj′ə-nē)
n.
Hatred or mistrust of women.

mis′o·gyn′ic (mĭs′ə-jĭn′ĭk, -gī′nĭk) adj.

misogyny

[misoj′inē]
Etymology: Gk, misein, to hate, gyne, women
an aversion to women. misogynist, n., misogynistic, adj.

mi·sog·y·ny

(mi-soj'i-nē)
Aversion to or hatred of women.
[G. miseō, to hate, + gynē, woman]
References in periodicals archive ?
castree qu'evoque la misogynic et que theorise la psychanalyse n'est
And here the constant invocation of the virahini is not so remarkable, because this is quite common, but the frequent and unabashed descriptions of Dadu as the female married to God and experiencing God - the male as husband - in the sexual act are remarkable, given the nirguna concept of God and the general misogynic attitude of the Dadu Panthis.
Support for censorship of violent and misogynic rap lyrics an analysis of the third-person effect.
In the context of a humanistic model of gender and women's emerging roles as "learned ladies," she argues that women writers of religious and secular poetry and prose experienced a 'naissance' in the 16th century that was, alas, followed by a literary misogynic backlash.
In fact, his essay tends on the whole only to reinforce misogynic stereotypes: "Par leur nature, [les femmes] sont plus portees a tous les genres de dissimulation," he maintains.
A well-documented predictor of censorship is the third-person perception, the disparity between the extents to which a person believes media content adversely affects oneself as compared with others, and it has been shown to predict support for censorship of televised violence and pornography (Rojas, Shah, & Faber, 1996), violent and misogynic rap music (McLeod, Eveland, & Nathanson, 1997), political advertising (Salwen, 1998), televised aggression (Hoffner & Buchanan, 2002), and pornography (Lee & Tamborini, 2005).