misidentification syndrome

misidentification syndrome

(mĭs″ī-dĕn″tĭ-fĭ-kā′shŭn)
The delusion that a person, an object, or an environment has been duplicated and placed in a new location distant from the location of the original.
References in periodicals archive ?
Delusional misidentification syndrome can develop after the onset of focal or diffuse brain pathology, such as right hemispheric stroke, multiple sclerosis, hyperparathyroidism, traumatic brain injury, dementia, and schizophrenia.
Delusional misidentification syndromes and dementia: a border zone between neurology and psychiatry.
It's a form of delusional misidentification syndrome, or DMS, where the patient believes they're being persecuted by someone who disguises himself as other people.
They argued Kot suffered from paranoia and other acute symptoms associated with Capgras delusion, a misidentification syndrome common in patients diagnosed with schizophrenia.
Delusional misidentification syndrome includes a group of disorders that present delusions about oneself, others, places and objects.
With olanzapine treatment, delusional misidentification syndrome symptoms were cleared but in the meantime manic symptoms appeared.
Pexhibits a variant of Capgras syndrome, a type of delusional misidentification syndrome in which a person believes other people are not their true selves but have been replaced by identical imposters (Table).
Asomatognosia is a type of misidentification syndrome in which a patient misidentifies or is not aware of the condition of a part of his or her body.
Variants of Capgras syndrome--a misidentification syndrome in which a person believes other people have been replaced by identical imposters--are rare and often unrecognized.
Hoffmann, "Isolated Right Temporal Lobe Stroke Patients Present with Geschwind Gastaut Syndrome, Frontal Network Syndrome and Delusional Misidentification Syndromes," Behavioral Neurology 20:3 (2008), 83-9.
Capgras Syndrome (CS) is one of several disorders loosely grouped under the rubric of delusional misidentification syndromes (Christodoulou, 1991).
As with many of the misidentification syndromes, CS may arise from varied etiologies; neuropsychological testing generally reveals deficits associated with right hemisphere compromise, primarily in nonverbal memory and visuospatial and constructional skills.