misfeasance


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

misfeasance

[misfē′zəns]
Etymology: AS, missan, to miss; L, facere, to make
an improper performance of a lawful act, especially in a way that may cause damage or injury. Compare malfeasance, nonfeasance.

misfeasance

The performance of a legal act in an improper or unlawful manner.
References in periodicals archive ?
In a handed-down judgment, Mr Justice Williams ruled: "The claimants' case, in summary, was that the defendant's officers committed misfeasance in public office by deliberately or recklessly acting beyond their powers in the (corruption) LW3 investigation, prosecution and trial.
The relevant criminal probe on the charges with misfeasance in office and bribery was launched.
The paper begins by describing the main areas of conceptual overlap between the tort of misfeasance in a public office and public fiduciary duties.
He said that since the global financial crisis started in late 2007, financial institutions, markets and businesses have endured perpetual crises and rarely has a week passed without the emergence of a new allegation of financial misfeasance, fraud or corruption.
The only way to keep Wall Street--and, for that matter, other institutions, like unions, universities, and the government itself--on the straight and narrow is to let the people in them know we're keeping an eye on them, and that the chances they'll "get away" with malfeasance, misfeasance, or nonfeasance are slim enough to keep them from trying.
misfeasance in office by the officials of administrations of Ararat, Gegharkunik, Kotayk and Shirak regions in the process of provision of
While the council vote on Plumlee was unanimous, Councilor Jerry Shorey complained that he felt a termination should be "for cause" - based on a specific breach, misfeasance or other inappropiate action - rather than "without cause.
According to the paper, Alam pursued a civil case against the Cleveland force, and its chief constable was forced to admit to malicious prosecution and misfeasance in public office.
The letter of claim seeks Sir Mark's response to allegations that he was complicit in torture and misfeasance in public office, as well as negligence, and claims damages from him personally for the trauma involved.
Misfeasance tortfeasors must at the very least have been recklessly indifferent as to whether they were exceeding or abusing their public power or position and thereby risking harm.
The probabilities for so much mal- and misfeasance to have occurred for so long without recognition of the potential of devastating consequences are 1 in 10 to the 10,000th power.
Justice Rand characterized this as "malice", which in turn triggered liability to a uniquely public law tort known nowadays as misfeasance in public office.