misclassification

(redirected from misclassify)
Also found in: Dictionary, Legal.

misclassification

(mis-kla″sĭ-fĭ-kā′shŏn)
Inaccurate diagnosis; incorrect assignment of an individual to a group that appears to have some similar characteristics.
misclassify (-kla′sĭ-fī″)
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Misclassification occurs frequently both because the laws defining the employment relationship are opaque and because the motivation to misclassify is strong.
Although liability under the new law extends to anyone who advises an employer to misclassify a worker, it does not extend to attorneys.
Requires state unemployment insurance agencies to conduct auditing and investigative programs to detect employers that misclassify or fail to properly report compensation to workers with the effect of excluding employees from unemployment compensation coverage.
Enhanced testing would miss 9 of 60 patients with CAD and misclassify 8 of 40 without disease.
In addition, I expect web-based investors to misclassify more unaudited information as audited than the reverse.
FedEx has long said it did not misclassify these workers.
Furthermore, we will test whether individuals higher in anxiety are more prone to take a better safe than sorry strategy and misclassify benign sensations (e.
Workers' rights groups in Texas are revamping their efforts to increase protections for low-income laborers by urging lawmakers to crack down on employers that intentionally misclassify their employees.
And they are seizing on lost tax dollars from employers who misclassify workers as independent contractors as one way to replenish their coffers.
Many state officials are of the view that businesses routinely misclassify their workers as independent contractors as a way to avoid the financial responsibilities of being their employer.
Many businesses rely on that lack of knowledge to utilize unfair bargaining power and misclassify employees and avoid paying overtime wages.
Employers benefit because companies that misclassify workers can under-bid law-abiding employers by as much as 30 percent.