mirror neurons


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mirror neurons

A class of neurons that respond when a person performs certain physical movement and also when another person is observed doing the same. They underlie imitative action and awareness and understanding of another person's act, intention or emotion. It has been found that people with autism have a lack of mirrir neuron activity in several part of the brain.
References in periodicals archive ?
The discovery of a new class of neurons named mirror neurons (Umilta et al.
When you wince while seeing someone experience pain -- a phenomenon called "neural resonance" -- mirror neurons are responsible.
A group of scientists led by Evelyne Kohler have made experiments to see if the mirror neurons of the monkeys discharge when they hear someone acts.
Despite that potential benefit, for our mirror neurons to be activated, we need characters to feel for.
JS: Our mirror neurons help us to behave and feel in the same way that other people do in a real context or on the screen without any concrete movement.
We also come equipped with mirror neurons, brain cells that allow us to grasp and emulate others' emotions, laying the foundation for group responses aimed at the greater good.
The discovery of mirror neurons in the prefrontal cortex of monkeys (Gallese, Fadiga, Fogassi, & Rizzolatti, 1996) and humans (Mukamel, Ekstrom, Kaplan, Iacoboni, & Fried, 2010) based on non invasive neuroelectrophysiological assessment or functional brain imaging techniques showed that motor representations in the brain could be activated when individuals learn motor actions via execution (as in traditional motor learning), imitation, observation (as in observational learning) and motor imagery (Buccino, Binkofski, & Riggio, 2004; Page, Szaflarski, Eliassen, Pan, & Cramer, 2009; Stefan, Cohen, & Duque, 2005).
Of particular relevance for art is the fact that mirror neurons are normally activated not only by observing actual instances of emotional expression and action in others but also by seeing images of such phenomena.
But unlike dry business presentations, stories also activate deep brain structures--like the listener's mirror neurons and insula--that engage the listener's emotions.
Ramachandran suggests the development of mirror neurons was most likely the cause of rapid advancement in cognitive awareness, skills, and technology.
Some of these potential approaches to promote recovery of movement of the upper limb are based on the discovery of mirror neurons.
In fact, humans often mirror one another's emotions, and Matteo Rizzato and Davide Donelli's I Am Your Mirror explains how mirror neurons work.